Brain & Nerve Regeneration with New Stem Cell Discovery

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Lund University researchers in Sweden have discovered a new novel source of stem cells located in adult human brains. This exciting discovery holds tremendous potential as far as being able to regenerate individuals with impaired brain and or nervous system function.

Potential disorders this new therapy may be applicable for include those suffering from Alzheimer’s disease, which is also referred to as Cognitive Dysfunction Syndrome in pets, traumatic brain injuries and even nerve repair for a wide range of neuro-degenerative disorders from Parkinson’s disease to paralysis and various debilitating spinal cord injuries.

These new novel stem cells are different than any type of stem cell previously identified and appear to be quite abundant in the adult brain. More importantly they can differentiate and can grow into many different types of cells including brain and nerve cells.

Another unique feature of these stem cells is their ability to contribute and lead to repair and wound healing not only in the brain but also in the spinal cord.

Scientists are working to control and enhance the self-healing properties of these stem cells to develop therapies targeted to heal and repair specific injuries and damage to both the brain and spinal cord.

It is also worthy to note that a similar type of novel stem cell has been identified in various organs demonstrating the ability to grow and differentiate into muscle, bone and cartilage cells.

The potential therapies these stem cells offer hold tremendous potential for a wide variety of brain and nervous system disorders not previously curable that affect people and pets.

About the Author

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat and a practicing, holistic veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients. Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats

 

 

Stem Cell Therapy May Prevent Pet Arthritis

Arthritis, Arthritis, Ask Dr. Carol, Cats, Dogs, Pet News No Comments »

Today researchers estimate that 20% or one out of every five dogs develops some form of canine arthritis. Published studies validate the fact that by age two, 85 percent of dogs have radiographic evidence of arthritic bone lesions whether or not visible signs of limping or lameness are present.

Canine Arthritis can develop with or without previous injury to a bone or a joint however the odds of developing arthritis increase dramatically, regardless of the method of fixation used, after a fracture occurs.

Until now, few preparations exist that significantly impact the rate of arthritis development after a bone or joint injury. Researchers from Duke University injected 10,000 special stem cells called mesenchymal cells into fractured joints of mice and found that they acted to prevent arthritis development in the previously fractured joints. Their research was recently published in the Journal of Cell Transplantation.

The scientists at Duke’s Biomedical Engineering Department are hopeful that their research will offer new therapy to prevent arthritis development in fractured joints and bones when injected appropriately and in a timely manner.

Their primary focus was the knee joint which is also referred to as a stifle joint in pets. In fact, knee injuries represent the number one most common musculoskeletal injury in pets in the USA. Similar to a basket all player “on the bench” due to an ACL injury, pets experience the exact same issue.

These mesenchymal stem cells were derived from bone marrow and are very young immature cells not destined to become blood cells. The stem cells were placed in a low oxygen environment which researchers found allows them to grow more quickly so enough could be generated to inject into the joint(s) in question to be effective.

Researchers hypothesize that the purified mesenchymal stem cells work by altering the body’s response to joint inflammation and they also appear to modify cytokines which alter an individual’s immune response favorably to help boost regeneration in knee joints in this case.

This research holds tremendous promise for pets and people suffering with post traumatic arthritic bone and joint injuries.

Funding for this study was provided by the National Institute of Health (NIH) along with the Arthritis Foundation.

 

About the Author

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat and a practicing, holistic veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients. Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions by phone

and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats

New Hope for Heart Failure Patients

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Heart Failure Patients Hold New Hope : According to a recently published study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology and reported by the American Heart Association, damaged heart tissue taken from elderly mice, pigs and people already in heart failure was successfully rejuvenated by a technique using modified stem cells.

The research holds tremendous potential and may soon lead to new therapies for heart failure patients, both pets and people.

A small sample of the diseased heart tissue was taken by a biopsy from each patient, modified by adding a protein called PIM-1and transplanted back into each individual. Within just 4 weeks, new heart tissue cell growth was detected. The new heart or cardiac cells turned out to be normal, in both structure and function.

Basically, scientists took degenerated, diseased heart cells, rejuvenated them with PIM-1 which made them healthier then transplanted them back into each patient.

PIM-1 is a protein that promotes cell growth and survival by increasing the activity of an enzyme called telomerase that lengthens chromosomes by preventing segments called telomeres from shrinking in length and falling off the end(s)of the chromosome. Telomere’s are small caps located at the ends of each chromosome responsible for facilitating cell growth and replication. When telomeres breaks off from the end(s) of chromosomes, the cell or cells in question, in this case heart cells, age, become diseased and die.

Although this study was limited to a small group of individuals this veterinarian and author feel this technique holds tremendous promise for heart failure patients both human and animal.

Potentially making stem cell engineering is a viable option, especially exciting for heart failure patients in this case, because the PIM-1 modification offers a significant advance in our ability as practitioners to offer clinical treatment in humans, dogs and cats.

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat and a practicing holistic veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

Dr Carol examines Lassie

She welcomes new canine and feline patients.

Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

 

Veterinarians Use Fat to Relieve Arthritis in Painful Pooches

Arthritis, Dogs, Pet News No Comments »

arthritis dog stifle joint Chagrin Falls, Ohio-December 23, 2008
Stem cells harvested from a dog’s own body fat bring relief to suffering arthritic pets!

For millions of dogs, the act of getting out of bed in the morning is a painful affair. Although many pet owners think their pets have slowed down simply because of old age, the truth is that many are suffering from degenerative joint disease, better known as arthritis. A new science is promising relief, but can it ease a dog’s discomfort and is it worth the cost?

More than 15 million dogs in North America suffer from arthritis. Some receive daily doses of pain medications and others are lucky enough to find their way to physical therapy. Unfortunately, many owners aren’t equipped emotionally or financially to help a pet who suffers from a severe case of this disease. Sadly, these owners believe that euthanasia is the only viable option.

Change is on the way! Vet-Stem Technologies (www.vet-stem.com) has developed a stem cell therapy that may actually save the lives of these dogs. Using the dog’s own fat, Vet-Stem is able to purify and extract adult stem cells which are then injected into the dog’s arthritic joint. Since these are not embryonic stem cells and the dog is his own donor, there is no ethical controversy surrounding this protocol.

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Stem Cell Therapy For Painful Pups

Arthritis, Dogs, Pet News 3 Comments »


Millions of dogs suffer the aches and discomfort of arthritis. Millions more may be hurting without any obvious signs. Now, a new science, using cells derived from the pet’s own fat, may bring relief too many painful pooches.

With pet arthritis, you can almost feel the pain your pet is suffering. You watch as he struggles to rise from his bed, cringe as he slowly ascends the stairs, and you can even hear the creaks and groans as he stretches out before his morning walk.

More than 15 million dogs in North America suffer some form of degenerative joint disease, better known as arthritis. Unfortunately, many dog owners are completely unaware of the pain their pet is experiencing, chalking up the slow movement to the effects of “old age”.

Some dogs may receive daily doses of pain relievers and oral joint care supplements. Still others might find their way to physical therapy or rehabilitation. Some lucky pets even get ramps built in their homes, sparing them the need to climb the dreaded stairs!

But for some, any or all of these options are not enough to relieve the pain. Sadly, many owners decide to euthanize their faithful companion, because of the severity of the pain or the continued high cost of treatment.

Now a potentially helpful treatment may be on the horizon, stem cell therapy!

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Bone Marrow Stem Cell Transplants for Dogs with Cancer

Avoiding Disease, Dogs, PAAWS Success Stories, Pet News, Systemic Illnesses No Comments »

Dogs diagnosed with a very common type of cancer called Lymphoma now have new hope due to the efforts of veterinarians at North Carolina State School of Veterinary Medicine
This is the first vet clinic in the United States to offer bone-marrow transplants for dogs. They expect to perform their first operation within the next month, according to Dr. Steven Suter who is heading up the transplant efforts.
The procedure is possible due to three leukophoresis machines donated by the famed mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. The machines, which cost about $80,000 each, harvest healthy stem cells from canine patients with lymphoma cancer which often originates in lymph nodes. The healthy new cells are then reintroduced to the dog after total body radiation is used to kill the cancer cells left in the body.
Although the Mayo Clinic has used the machines for people, little to no modification are needed for it to be used on dogs. Bone-marrow therapy treatments were tested on dogs for many years before being used for people.
The cost is estimated at approximately $15,000 for each dog. While this seems pricy at first glance, the truth is that it’s not that much more than many pet owners spend to provide chemotherapy for their canine companions with lymphoma. The problem with chemotherapy is that aside from cost, it offers no real cure and ultimately these dogs do not survive.
Expected survival rate for dogs that undergo a bone-marrow transplant is estimated at 30 to 50 percent. Some chemotherapy will still be used in addition to the transplant. That cost should be less than $1500.00.
While bone-marrow transplants have been performed on dogs in research settings for decades, only a few have been done by veterinarians in private practice. Dr. Ed Sullivan of Bellingham, Wash., near Seattle, has performed six of the procedures over the past few years, charging as much as $35,000 for the operation.
Washington State University School of Veterinary Medicine hopes to offer the transplants for dogs in the near future according to Dr. Jeffrey Bryan, who is the leader of the transplant effort in the WSU vet school.
Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest pet health updates and news for your dog and cat. Holistic veterinarian and author, Dr. Carol Osborne, D.V.M. successfully works with many dogs diagnosed with lymphoma, extending their life span naturally by an average of 2 quality years, rather than the average 4-6 months past diagnosis. Dr. Osborne is available for personal pet consultations Toll Free at 1-866-372-2765.

 
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