New Dog Lymphoma Cancer Drug

Ask Dr. Carol, Cancer, Dogs, Pet News No Comments »

Pet cancer is the leading killer of dogs in America today. Lymphoma cancer is one of the most common types of cancer affecting canines, especially prevalent in Golden Retrievers.

Statistically, traditional pet therapy for Canine Lymphoma Cancer generally affords dogs up to a one year survival time. Without traditional veterinary medications, average survival post diagnosis in dogs may only be from one to three months.

Survival time for affected canines using natural or alternative pet cancer therapies varies, depending on the exact nutrients, supplements and diet being used to treat the cancer.

Veterinary Emerging Technologies Development Corporation, also referred to as VetDC, just announced that it has successfully raised 1.5 million dollars to develop the first drug specifically developed to combat Canine Lymphoma Cancer. The new drug is called VDC-1101. Initially VDC-1101 was investigated as a potential therapy for humans with Lymphoma cancer.

Human trials have stopped and now, new research is being conducted for affected dogs. Researchers hope to make this new drug available to dogs within the next two years.

According to Dr. Greg Ogilvie, DVM, a veterinarian and pet cancer specialist, not associated with VetDC, “this is a blessing.”

Currently, only two medications are specifically approved by the FDA to fight canine cancer in the United States. Unfortunately, neither drug targets Lymphoma Cancer. The two drugs in question: Palladia, approved by the U.S Food and Drug Administration in 2009, to treat skin based Mast Cell Tumors, and Oncept, a DNA vaccine approved in 2010 for Melanoma Cancer affecting the mouth and oral cavity of dogs.

Today, the chemotherapy drugs being used in various canine cancer therapy protocols are medications originally developed for humans, then abandoned. None are specifically approved for use in dogs.

Under the Animal Medicinal Drug Use Clarification Act of 1994, the use of human cancer drugs in veterinary patients including dogs is considered to be an allowable “extra-label” use.

After its initial launch in 2010, VetDC acquired a license from Gilead Sciences Inc., for a molecule that selectively targets and kills cancerous lymphoma cancer cells called GS-9219. VetDC renamed the molecule VDC-1101.

Apparently, clinical trials using GS-9219 in dogs with Lymphoma Cancer preceded those in humans. Although results with this drug in people did not meet the companies’ expectations, dogs with Lymphoma cancer showed an 80 percent response rate.

According to Dr. Ogilvie’s review of the data, “tentative results look very promising.”

Certainly veterinarians hope to offer much more when it comes to managing pet cancer in the future.

Instead of offering pets increased survival times of several months, vets would prefer to ward off pet cancer for four to five years, offering pet owners affordable solutions that also maximize daily quality of life and minimize adverse effects.

Realistically speaking, prospective data from canine clinical trials is encouraging and the company hopes to offer pets at least a fifty percent increase in survival time.

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat, a published author and a practicing, holistic veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients.

Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and makes homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats

How to Trim Your Dogs Nails

Ask Dr. Carol, Dogs, General Health No Comments »

Pet pedicures for your canine are important because overgrown nails can cause painful infections. Some dogs are active enough to wear their toenails down, but if you can hear a clicking noise when your dog walks across a hard floor, his nails are probably too long. For most dogs, nail trims once a month are best. Many dogs do not like having their feet handled, but if you start trimming your dog’s nails while he is still a puppy he will learn to tolerate nail trims.

A dew claw is a ‘fifth’ toe located in the thumb position, which may or may not be present. If your dog has dew claws then they need trimming too. When dewclaws overgrow they curl inward and can grow into the skin causing painful infections. They are also easily snagged and torn.

TIP: Dog Nail trims are important. Start with young puppies so they learn to accept them.

What You And Your Vet Can Do

Don’t use regular scissors to cut nails, they are not strong enough and can cause the nail to split. Use a clipper designed specifically for dog nails which can also be used for dewclaws.

Two different styles, primarily Guillotine and Roscoe, are available commercially and both work well as long as the blades are sharp. A metal nail file helps smooth edges down after the trim.

A blood vessel runs down the center of each nail that will bleed if the nail is cut too short. The vessel is easiest to see on the white nails so start with a white nail and use it as a reference for the dark nails. Just trim the tip that curves downwards so the nail remains parallel to the toe.


In case you trim a nail too short, have a styptic pencil (as sold for shaving cuts) or silver nitrate stick on hand to stop the bleeding. Flour, cornstarch or baking soda along with pressure will also work.

Each dog nail also contains a nerve called the quick. If you hit the nerve it is extremely painful. Professional groomers often use electric nail grinders. They let the quick recede which results in a shorter nail and a tighter paw.

Check the footpads and trim excess hair between the toes. A pair of scissors will work for this.

It is best to have dewclaws removed when puppies are just a few days old. They can also be removed later along with some other surgical procedure such as neutering or spaying.
Your vet or a professional groomer is best qualified to trim nails in nervous dogs or in those extremely apprehensive about having their feet handled.

NAIL TIP: Check your dog’s nails as part of his regular grooming routine. Problems can develop at the base of the nail that are easy to miss.

They tend to become infected and are uncomfortable.

Epsom salt soaks can provide symptomatic relief but in most cases, your vet will need to intervene.

Nail bed infections often require long-term antibiotic and/or anti-fungal therapy.

TIP: Guillotine clippers are very strong and are best suited for nail trims on large and giant breeds.

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat, a published author and a practicing, holistic veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients.

Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and makes homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats

New Year’s Pet Get-A-Ways

Ask Dr. Carol, Cats, Dogs, Pet Travel Tips No Comments »

Fun, safe, and exciting adventures to enjoy and explore for pets and their people this New Year.

If you’re planning a vacation this New Year and plan to travel with Fido and/or Fluffy, you’re in luck! The fact is traveling with pets has become the latest rage.

Not only have nearly 45,000 pet-friendly venues opened their doors to pet travelers, they are competing for your business and are ready, willing and able to pamper your pooch and cater to your every whimper.

The ever growing pack of pet-friendly properties includes hotels ranging from the Hilton and Ritz Carlton to the Starwood and the Hotel W Chain.

Pet Perks for 2013 include amenities from designer dog beds made to match their human signature counterparts, plush puppy ropes along with leashes, collars and even personal puppy pagers. Pet massage therapists are on call and ready to roll when your pet needs a good massage.

Gourmut treats, made to order are prepared and placed on your pet’s pillow at turndown time.

For the casual pet traveler, offers include camp grounds, off leash parks, ski resorts, like Telluride and pet friendly beaches in Key West and Santa Belle.

Now, for those of you flying the friendly skies, it’s finally time for pet lovers to rejoice. You don’t have to worry about putting your pet in cold cargo holds anymore; dogs and cats now fly first class on Pet Airways. It’s the first pets only, no humans allowed airline.

Pets embark on a gorgeous, Beech craft 1900. The pet jet accommodates 19 “pawsengers and offer nonstop service between nine major U.S. cities. Believe it or not, the demand is so high; this pet jet has already increased their flight schedule by over 30% since their initial launch, last July.

Pets are hand-walked up the paw-printed ramp into the jet’s cabin which is fully lit, climate controlled and pressurized. Even better is the fact that pet owners no longer have to worry about a “carrier” because each cabin becomes fully stocked with custom carriers available to fit pets of all shapes and sizes.

Before your trip, it is important to plan well ahead of time and make sure that your pet is welcome at the destination of your choice. Next visit your vet to ensure your pet is healthy and able to travel. While you’re at your veterinarian’s office, your pet will receive a physical exam, and his or her vaccine records and inoculation dates will be reviewed so you pet is up to date on his shots. Keeping a copy of your pet’s records, with you is always a good idea. This is very helpful so that pet owners are able to address unexpected pet health issues which tend to arise when we least expect them.

For pet lovers traveling by commercial airlines, you’ll need to have a health certificate signed by your veterinarian within ten to thirty dates of the date of your departure. Remember that certain pets, especially those that are very old, young, sick or frail, as well as pets that are pregnant or in heat, may be best left at home.

If you’re at a loss as to where to keep your pet or wondering how to find someone to watch your pet, visit House Sitters of America online. They’ve got a staff of true pet lovers, some of whom will even “pet sit” at no charge.

Once you finalize your pet’s health check-up with the vet, it’s time to visit your groomer. Make sure that your pet is clean, smells good and his or her nails are well trimmed.

Finally, pet travelers should respond to basic obedience and at the very minimum. For example, pets should come when called as well as sit and stay. Unruly pets that lack manners, tend to be aggressive or are chronic barkers are generally not ideal traveling companions and in most cases are better off left at home.

Now what about commercial airline pet carriers?

The definition of an “airline approved pet carriers is one that is big enough for your pet to “stand up, sit down, turn around and lie down.”

Should you be traveling by another means and not in need a traditional pet carrier, today choices run the gamut from pet safety belts and car seats to custom harnesses, all of which make great, safe pet travel alternatives.

Remember to plan ahead and be sure your pet is healthy.

Then just sit back, relax and enjoy!

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat, a published author and a practicing, holistic veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients.

Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and makes homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats

 

 

How to Detect & Manage Dog Arthritis

Arthritis, Ask Dr. Carol, Dogs 1 Comment »

Dog Arthritis, which is also referred to as degenerative joint disease or osteoarthritis, is defined as inflammation of the joints. Recent research indicates radio-graphic lesions of arthritis are apparent in 95% of dogs at age two, and 99% of people at age 35, regardless of whether or not visible signs are apparent. 20 percent or one out of every five dogs two years of age and older are afflicted. The number of dogs affected doubles after age seven. Although arthritis is more common in large dogs, small dogs and cats (and even horses) also suffer.

What is Dog Arthritis

Canine arthritis is a painful, progressive condition that destroys the cartilage and connective tissue, which normally act as a cushion and absorb shock between bones and joints. It is characterized by loss of the smooth cartilage that covers and protects the ends of the bones in moveable joints. Since cartilage has no nerves, when it rubs against the cartilage of another bone there is no pain. On the other hand, bones do have nerves so once the cartilage wears away, the exposed bone rubs against the other bone in the joint. Now that causes pain and it hurts. The level of pain increases as the disease gets worse and progresses.

 Causes of Dog Arthritis

Arthritis in dogs can result from aging and every day wear and tear. Pets can be genetically prone because of a hereditary condition such as dysplasia, or abnormal growth and malformation of the hips or elbows. Arthritis can occur secondary to an injury such as a broken pelvic bone, a fracture involving a joint or a damaged cruciate ligament in the knee.

 Signs of Dog Arthritis

The signs of dog arthritis vary depending on exactly which joint or joints are affected, the age of the pet and the severity of the disease. Arthritis may occur due to hereditary with a genetic link and/ or may occur secondarily as a result of the natural aging process, excessive body weight load on the joints and/or trauma. In most cases, arthritis results from a combination of these factors. An alteration of your pet’s normal gait is usually visible because pets naturally place extra weight on the unaffected leg(s) to lessen the pain on the affected leg.

When arthritis affects your dogs hips, the condition is referred to as hip dysplasia, which is classic in German Shepard’s  In this case the muscles on the afflicted leg also often atrophy or become smaller in size because the dog uses it less or puts less weight on it. Often the muscles of the chest and shoulders actually become larger in size as the dog naturally puts more weight on his front legs to support his body.

Early signs are subtle and may be easily misinterpreted as slowing down due to old age aches and pains when in reality many if not most of these pets are suffering from arthritis. Initially dogs might be a little stiff in the morning, find it difficult to stand up after lying down and hesitate before beginning to walk. Advanced signs of canine arthritis include limping, lameness, decreased activity, stiffness, and reluctance to stand.

Many dogs have a hard time climbing stairs, and are unable to jump up into your car or up onto your bed. In addition to losing interest in running around the back yard and playing, owners may notice changes in their pet’s appetite and behavior. Rather than being active family members, some dogs prefer to be left alone and may hide in corners or just sleep the day away under a table. Depending on the amount of pain, some dogs eat less, may lick and/or bite at the painful area and seek out warm, soft places to sleep.

Diagnosis of Dog Arthritis

The first step to a diagnosis involves a visit to your vet and a complete examination. Your veterinarian will discuss signs, your pet’s history, perform a variety of physical limb and joint manipulative tests and take x-rays to pinpoint the location and severity of the disease.

Treatment Options for Dog Arthritis

Treatments may be surgical, medical and/or nutritional depending on the exact condition.

Management of Dog Arthritis

Medical management, weight control and moderate exercise allow many pets to live a relatively pain free life. Medical management traditionally consisted of two types of drugs. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, are referred to as NSAID’s. NSAID’s include prescription medications including Rimadyl, Ectogesic (Rimadyl and Ectogesic should not be used in cats) Deramax and Meticam. Steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, include steroids such as prednisone, prednisolone and azium. Both classes of drugs are generally effective to relieve pain but can carry serious side effects. Steroids are often considered a last resort in many chronic canine arthritis cases.

New, natural remedies have proven to offer similar benefits without the risks. Moderate exercise helps maintain joint mobility and muscle strength for joint support. Weight control helps reduce the burden of excess soft tissue the joints must support.

Today the marketplace offers a wide variety of natural, nutritional pet arthritis products that are safe and effective. Together these products help to minimize arthritis pain and inflammation while increasing joint lubrication and flexibility and enhancing the joints ability to absorb shock. Because age, breed, diet, lifestyle, injury and stress can affect the health and function of joints in different ways, your veterinarian will help you determined the best product for your pet’s condition. Correct and consistent administration is essential for optimum results.

Effective, natural, over the counter pet arthritis remedies include various combinations of Glucosamine, Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM), Chondroitan sulfate, Hyaluronic acid, Vitamin C and Omega-3 Fatty Acids. These nutrients support joint function and connective tissue health and many are now formulated specifically for pets as tasty, chewable tablets for dogs, and flavored encapsulated powders for cats, given daily according to body weight.

Adequan is a polysulfated glycosaminoglycan derived from the windpipe cartilage of cattle. It is available as an injection through veterinarians.

TIP: Avoid aspirin in dogs and: it can cause stomach or gastric ulcers in dogs.

TIP: Add a teaspoon of extra virgin olive oil to your pet’s food or cook your pet’s meals in olive oil. It smells good, tastes great, adds flavor and is a wonderful source of Omega-3 Fatty Acids.

TIP: Keeping your pet lean helps avoid excess joint stress and reduces the risk of developing arthritis.

TIP: Acupuncture is an option which offers pets various degrees of arthritic pain relief. The relief is temporary in most cases.

TIP: Canine Stem Cell Therapy is a relatively new option available to arthritic dogs that seems to hold tremendous hope for many canines.

Proper exercise is wonderful physical therapy for arthritic joints and it reduces the risk of permanent disability due to arthritis by 33 percent. Exercise helps maintain your pets muscle mass which supports his joints. Massage along with gentle flexion and extension of joints and swimming are also very beneficial. Treatment for joint disease often involves a combination of therapies and your vet will help you decide which options are best for your dog.

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat, a published author and a practicing, holistic veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients.

Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and makes homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats

 

Pet Wintertime Hazards and SafetyTips

Ask Dr. Carol, Cats, Dogs, Winter Time Tips, Winter Time Tips No Comments »

Along with the end of the Holiday rush, for many of us this New Year, also brings winter’s chilling snow and frigid temperatures. Refreshing your Wintertime Pet IQ helps to make the season as fun for you as it is for your pets.

Antifreeze is deadly for pets! It also smells and tastes good to pets. Less than one tablespoon may be lethal for a ten pound dog. A single teaspoon can be fatal to cats.

Propylene glycol is a less toxic form of antifreeze and can be used instead of ethylene glycol. The brand is called “Sierra. It works just as well in your car but is much less toxic to your pet.

TIP: Beginning January 2013, antifreeze manufacturers in all 50 states will be adding a bitter flavoring agent to antifreeze to make it less attractive to pets and children.

Keep your pets out of the area you’re in when you change and/or drain antifreeze  from your car.

Check your car regularly for radiator leeks as they also contain anti-freeze.

Clean up any chemical spills immediately and thoroughly.

Store chemicals and pesticides in tightly closed containers and keep them in secured cabinets up high out of paw reach.

If you think your pet has consumed anti-freeze, this is a true life or death emergency! Go to your veterinarian ASAP and call ahead while you are on your way!

Ice Melting Products like Rock salt and De-icing chemicals are irritating to your pet’s skin and mouth as well as your pet’s paws and foot pads. Spritz your pet’s feet off with water when he or she comes back inside to help remove these irritating chemicals. Signs of ingestion in dogs and cats include excess drooling, depression and vomiting.

Rat and Mouse baits are usually used more often in cold weather. Place rodent baits in areas inaccessible to your pets. Peanut butter baits smell good and are tasty to pets. Save labels and if you think it’s been eaten by your pet, call ahead and drive to your veterinarian, ASAP. Most pets are treated with Vitamin K therapy and recover without further problems.

Feed your pet a little extra when it’s cold outside. Pets need extra calories to produce energy during cold weather to keep warm.

Provide your pet with plenty of fresh water to help avoid dehydration. Warm up the water and add a little honey or a bouillon cube to stimulate your pet to drink. Chicken noodle soup is great and most pets enjoy a bowl every now and then. Snow is not an acceptable substitute for water at any time.

Bring your pet indoors when it’s very cold outside and if he or she spends a lot of time outdoors’s be sure to provide proper shelter with extra  bedding and a wind flap.

Groom your dog and cat regularly to remove mats. This helps your pets hair coat to provide proper insulation so he or she can stay warm during the winter season.

Frost bite risk areas include your pet’s ears, nose, tip of the tail and ears. Frostbitten areas of your pet’s skin initially turn a reddish color then they become gray.

To Treat Frostbite: give your pet a warm bath and wrap him or her up in warm towels. Offer your pet something warm like chicken soup and call your veterinarian Don’t  rub an area that  has frostbite!

Monitor heat lights and heating pads as they can get too warm quite quickly and can cause skin burns.

Cats enjoy hiding under your car’s hood near warm engines. Before starting your car this winter, look under your hood and honk your horn.

Watch out for frozen lakes, rivers and ponds. Pets can easily to slip and fall in frozen water. Unfortunately not all pets can swim especially in freezing water.

Visit your veterinarian and be sure your pet is healthy as pets, like people are more susceptible to health issues in cold weather.

Give your pet lots of extra attention this New Year and for those pet lovers living in wintertime climates be sure to keep warm and enjoy the season.

Always be prepared and remember the best gift of all is your LOVE!

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat, a published author and a practicing, holistic veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients.

Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and makes homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats

 

 

Pudgy Pets: How to Battle the Bulge this New Year

Ask Dr. Carol, Avoiding Disease, Cats, Dogs, Pet News No Comments »


Pet owners
wondering how to achieve and/or maintain a healthy body weight for Fido and Fluffy this New Year may want to think twice before reaching for traditional pet treats or snuggling up on the sofa with a pet video.

A new study suggests that both daily exercise and calories consumed are related to body weight.

Altering either, for example increasing exercise by 20 minutes a day or reducing calories by even ten percent, correlates with a reduction in your pet’s body mass index (BMI) and a corresponding increase in the quality of your pet’s health status and future longevity.

Ultimately researchers found that making small changes in your dog or cat’s diet and/or daily exercise may lead to a reduction in the number of pets that suffer with obesity.

Obesity which affects nearly fifty percent of America’s dogs and cats is defined as being 15 percent or more above the ideal weight for that pet’s age and breed.

Being just ten percent overweight reduces your pet’s life span by one-third and predisposes him or her to a variety of disorders ranging from arthritis and diabetes to cancer and heart disease.

Hormones and genetics as well as individual variations in metabolism and appetite are predisposing factors. However, the single most common cause of obesity in pets today is well meaning owners who indulge their pets with oversized portions and excessive treats.

Pet obesity has become a multi-dimensional issue with social and veterinary medical factors but maintaining a healthy pet body weight is essentially the difference between energy consumed and energy expended.

This study focused on both factors together as they relate to pet health and longevity.

Results indicated that increasing exercise by one hour ads up to four extra days to your pet’s lifespan.

Reducing your pet’s body weight by just ten percent increases his or her potential healthy lifespan by up to thirty three percent.

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat, a published author and a practicing, holistic veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients.

Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and makes homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats

Antifreeze Made Safer for Pets

Ask Dr. Carol, Cats, Dogs, Pet News, Winter Time Tips, Winter Time Tips No Comments »

The Consumer Specialty Products Association along with the Humane Society Legislative Fund made a joint announcement on December 13, 2012 that antifreeze and other engine and radiator coolants manufactured in all 50 states will now contain a bitter flavoring agent.

Previous to this announcement, antifreeze smelled and tasted sweet which made it attractive to pets and children. Unfortunately antifreeze is also deadly. Less than one tablespoon is lethal for a ten pound dog. A single teaspoon can be fatal to a cat.

The active ingredient in antifreeze is ethylene glycol which if ingested by a dog or cat leads to simultaneous liver and kidney failure which after just a few hours is irreversible and consequently fatal. The treatment for antifreeze ingestion when applicable is intravenous Vodka.

Sierra is a brand name of for a type of antifreeze that contains propylene glycol as the active ingredient instead of ethylene glycol. This type of antifreeze works just as well in your car but is slightly less toxic than ethylene glycol if ingested by a pet. Unfortunately Sierra smells and tasted good to pets so it remains a potential health risk.

According to the Humane Society Legislative Fund nearly 90,000 animals are poisoned each year by ingesting this sweet smelling substance.

Remember to keep your pets out of the area you are in when you change and/or drain antifreeze from your car.

Be sure to check your cat or truck regularly for leeks as they also contain antifreeze. Store antifreeze in tightly closed containers and keep it in secured cabinets.

If you think your pet may have consumed antifreeze, remember, this is a true life or death emergency.

Drive to your vet or the closest emergency facility ASAP and call ahead while you are on your way

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry confirms that Ethylene glycol is rapidly absorbed following ingestion and affects the entire body beginning with the central nervous system, followed by the heart and lungs and finally failure of the kidneys and liver which leads to death.

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat, a published author and a practicing, holistic veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients.

Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and makes homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats

Top 10 Dog Breeds of 2012

Ask Dr. Carol, Dogs, Pet News No Comments »

Dog lovers across the country have been polled and have voiced their opinions as to America’s favorite canine breeds for 2012. From Designer Dogs to the “Heinz 57” here are our countries most beloved canines.

1. Leading the pack for the second year in a row and pictured on the left in pink is the Maltipoo. This little bundle of fur was created by crossing a Maltese with a Toy Poodle. Maltipoo’s are notorious for their warm, loving personalities. They are good with kids, make great family pets and work well as therapy dogs.

2. Referred to as the original “designer dog”, and retaining spot number two for the second year in a row is the Cockapoo. Shown lying on a blue blanket below, this breed resulted from crossing a Toy Poodle with a Cocker Spaniel. Many say Cockapoo’s inherited the best of both breeds.

3. More popular this year than last, the Maltese-Shih-Tzu was derived by combining a Maltese with a Shih-Tzu. Photographed below the Cockapoo with a white and tan hair-coat, this well rounded, small breed family dog was initially bred not to shed.

4. Dropping one point in popularity from 2011, the Bishon Frise ranked fourth this year. These sensitive, friendly yet delicate dogs are often recommended for people with pet allergies. These dogs do shed and require regular grooming. Bishon’s are well suited for mature families and adults and prefer to spend their time with people as opposed to being left alone.

5. The Shih-Tzu jumped up two notches and this year came in fifth. Shih-Tzu’s make wonderful companions for adults, require regular grooming and can be temper mental.

6. Breeding a Pekinese with a Poodle, resulted in creating the Peekapoo. Moving up four notches this year, these dogs are small, friendly and energetic. They make great adult companions, need regular grooming and are prone to breed related eye issues.

7. Loving, loyal and smart, the Standard Poodle jumped up five places, ranking seventh in popularity for 2012. Poodles are well suited to adult living and shedding is minimal. This large breed dog needs lots of room to run and regular grooming is an absolute must.

8. Combining the Schnauzer with the Poodle resulted in America’s eighth favorite breed, the Schnoodle. These medium sized canines make loyal, fun loving family pets.

9. An American staple, the Laborador-Retriever ranked ninth in popularity this year. Warm, loving and fun, these large breed canines require minimal maintenance and make great family pets. Labrador’s are smart, loving and easy to train.

They make good hunting companions, are successful in “search & rescue missions and offer extreme versatility to pet lovers.

10. Coming in at number ten, the Puggle resulted by crossing a Beagle with a Pug.

This small short coated breed requires minimal daily maintenance. Puggle’s are active and energetic as well as, social and vocal.

They make good family pets, integrate well into multi-pet homes and can be slightly domineering in personality.

Ear infections can be an issue for some, due to their long, floppy ears.

 

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat, a published author and a practicing, holistic veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients.

Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and makes homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats

Pet Treats Recalled Due to Mold

Ask Dr. Carol, Dogs, Pet News, Pet Nutrition No Comments »

Claudia’s Canine Cuisine has issued a voluntary recall of 3 varieties of their pet treats. Sold in 7.5 ounce bags, Dog Candy Holiday Hound Cake and Blueberry Hound Cake are the three pet treats for which they issued this recall.

The packages were distributed to 130 Pet Smart stores in 36 states and have a “best buy” date of 08/2015.

Apparently the treats were packaged while they were still warm and this led to moisture concerns.

Excessive moisture attracts various pathogens especially Salmonella bacteria.

After closer inspection by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), mold was found on several of the cakes that had already been delivered to Pet Smart stores.

Claudia’s Canine Cuisine has reportedly implemented new procedures to correct the issue and help avoid its re-occurrence.

Despite any current reports of sickened dogs, pet owners are advised to discard the tainted treats.

The tainted pet treats may also be returned them to Pet Smart for a full refund. Consumers may also contact the Claudia’s Cuisine directly by calling 1-501-851-0002.

Consumers are also advised to practice good hygiene and wash their hands well and be sure to separate and sanitize pet bowls.

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat, a published author and a practicing, holistic veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients.

Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and makes homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats

Patented Pet Product Revives Old, Limping Dog

Dogs, PAAWS Success Stories No Comments »

Naturally we all want out pets to live forever and while that may not yet be possible I wanted to share this note below that I received from a grateful client with a 15 year young arthritic dog named Kiki.

Hi Dr. Carol,

I last spoke with you a little over a year and a half ago, when I first ordered Paaws vitamins for my pekingese Kiki.

Every few months Kiki would develop a bad limp when she would overdo things activity wise. I would have to completely shut her down for a couple of weeks until she stopped limping.

She just came in from outside, and tired me out chasing her around my house. When she has these morning bursts of energy she runs around like a puppy!

Kiki recently turned 15 years old!

Since I started her on Paaws Vitamins, she has had no issues with her joints or any of the limping episodes.

I have no doubt that Paaws has done wonders for my dog, thank you!

Andy L.

Detroit Michigan

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat, a published author and a practicing, holistic veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients.

Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and makes homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats.

 
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