Dog Skin Allergy & Knee (ACL) Injury Heal Naturally

Allergy, Ask Dr. Carol, Dogs, PAAWS Success Stories, Pet Nutrition No Comments »

Hello Fellow Pet Lovers!

I wanted to share a nice note I received from a pet owner whose dog, William, an 8 year old Cocker Spaniel, suffered with severe canine skin allergies and

weak stifle (Knee) ligaments called Anterior Cruciate Ligaments (ACL) which are located in the knees (stifles) of each hind leg, until they found a natural solution.

William- the Cocker Spaniel

Hello Dr. Carol,

Our William is a Cocker Spaniel who is very athletic, playful, competitive, lots of energy & very healthy loved member of our family.

……Thanks to the help & guidance of veterinarian, Dr. Carol Osborne.

Dr. Carol helped us with the home made diet that William enjoys today verses the commercial pet food on the market today.

She also helped us make up an elimination diet for William’s allergies.

William had so many pet food allergies all he did was lick and scratch and itch himself until his skin was raw and bleeding.

Now, William is on a healthy well balanced home-made diet that he really enjoys……no more itching.

William is also taking Dr. Carol’s PAAWS vitamins that he absolutely loves!  His extra energy and stamina were noticeable in just a couple short weeks.

His skin is clear and now his coat is beautiful.

Last year, William started limping and holding his left hind leg up off the ground….initially we went to our mainstream veterinarian and later to our orthopedic Veterinarian.

William had a torn ACL….he was put on restrictive activity and pain medications. Our vet said William might need surgery and sometimes even the surgery fails.

William & His Dad

I called Dr. Carol for advice. She suggested putting William on some of her ADVANCED FLEXIBILITY FORMULA.

……William’s knee healed very quickly….6 month later his right hind leg ACL tore.

……I immediately put William again on Dr. Carol’s ADVANCED FLEXIBILITY FORMULA and his right hind leg ACL healed as well.

Today William continues to be a very healthy, active, athletic, and happy member of our family….thanks to Dr. Carol Osborne!

We plan to keep William on your Paaws, Advanced Flexibility Formula and the home-made diet forever.

Dr. Carol we can’t thank you enough for all you have done to make our William a happy boy!

Rachael and Stan Demers

Chicago, Illinois

 

Holistic Veterinarian Dr. Carol Osborne, DVM

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Health Diplomat, a published author and a practicing, integrative veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients.

Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and creates homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats.

 

Pet Antioxidants Promote Pet Health in Dogs & Cat’s

Ask Dr. Carol, Cats, Dogs, Pet News, Pet Nutrition No Comments »

For the last 10 years, the word antioxidant has become part of our vocabulary. Pet Antioxidants are widely recognized as one of the most important weapons in the battle against pet disease. All the physiological processes in pets and people require oxygen, which provides us with energy.

Dogs Enjoy Veggies

How Antioxidants Benefit Pets Health

Unfortunately the byproducts of burning oxygen, which are similar to the sparks given off by a fire, are also produced in your pet’s body. These little sparks are commonly known as free radicals, and are the major cause of aging and degenerative disease in both people and pets.

Pet Antioxidants counteract the damaging effects of these everyday physiological processes in your pet’s body, by combating and eliminating these free radicals.

Dogs & Antioxidants: What are Pet Antioxidants?

Pet Antioxidants are the vitamins, minerals and enzymes that play a vital role in preventing the onset of chronic pet diseases such as cancer, diabetes, heart disease, dementia and canine Cognitive Dysfunction Syndrome (Alzheimer’s disease) along with canine arthritis, allergies and cataracts in dogs and cats.

Your pet’s body undergoes oxidative  stress when the capability of these antioxidants is overwhelmed by the number of free radicals being produced. Free radicals are continually formed in the body as part of normal biological processes, but other factors can contribute to an overload, such as pesticides, antibiotics, cigarette smoke, pollution, alcohol and foods that are fried at high temperatures or burnt.

Cats Need Antioxidants

Cats & Antioxidants

It’s believed that a human cell is exposed to roughly 100,000 free radical hits per second. The role of antioxidants is to ‘mop up’ free radicals. Natural, nutrient-rich foods and certain supplements, including Vitamin E and Co-enzyme Q10, have pet antioxidant benefits. They help to fight pet aging by attacking free radicals that would normally attack DNA, proteins and other body tissues in your pet. Carnosine, which is a natural amino acid, also counteracts the harmful effects of sugar on body proteins, while repairing any existing damage.

Pet Antioxidants help to keep your pet’s immune system strong. Glucosamine and MSM are powerful, naturally-occurring antioxidants in your pet’s body. Unfortunately, their levels peak as early as the age of two in pets and at the age of ten in people, after which time they decline by roughly 15 percent each decade. That’s why Glucosamine and MSM supplements are also routinely recommended by doctors and veterinarians to help patients recover from musculoskeletal injuries. Their anti-inflammatory properties provide significant relief from the debilitating effects of human and pet arthritis.

Antioxidant Rich Pet Foods

It’s also important to increase protein, fish oils, seeds, nuts, herbs, fruits and vegetables in your pet’s diet, and to limit sugar intake. Feeding nutritious pet foods can reduce the overall risk of heart, kidney and liver disease as well as diabetes, arthritis, cataracts, allergies and a range of other age-related pet diseases experienced by dogs and cats.

A team of nutritionists recently published a study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, outlining a number of common foods that have high levels of antioxidant qualities, using ORAC, or the oxygen radical absorbance capacity.

 

Top Antioxidant Rich Food Sources for Pets & People

 

Small red beans (or Mexican red bean – dried)

Blueberries (wild and cultivated)

Red kidney beans

Pinto beans

Cranberries

Blackberries

Prunes

Raspberries

Strawberries

Red delicious apples

Granny Smith apples

Pecans

Black plums

Russet potatoes (cooked)

Black beans (dried)

Plums

Gala apples

Cabbage

Broccoli

Wheat

Barley grasses

 

As a nutritional researcher and practicing integrative veterinarian, I recommend feeding dogs and cats as balanced a diet as possible so they can benefit from a wide range of antioxidant nutrients. For example, raspberries and strawberries contain ellagitannin, a substance that helps prevent the growth of cancerous cells. Pecans contain copper and potassium. Pinto and kidney beans contain high amount of folate, or vitamin B9, which lowers homocysteine levels, implicated in heart disease. Blueberries contain anthocyanin’s, shown to protect brain cells.

Veggies Benefit Dogs

Most antioxidant rich foods lose some of their antioxidant properties when processed, the exception being tomatoes. Tomatoes contain lycopene, which is actually enhanced by cooking.

But pet diets alone does not appear to be sufficient to maintain your dog or cat’s ideal antioxidant levels, so adding balanced, comprehensive, USA sourced, pet nutritional supplements to your dog and cat’s diet daily is vital.

Dr Carol Osborne, DVM

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat, a published author and a practicing, integrative veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients.

Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and makes homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark www.drcarol.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats

 

 

 

 

 

Natura Pet Foods Poisoning Pets: Recall Expands

Ask Dr. Carol, Cats, Dogs, Pet News, Pet Nutrition, Zoonotic Diseases No Comments »

Karma Pet Food Recall

Procter & Gamble (P&G) recently announced a voluntary recall of pet food products for dogs and cats after the Michigan Department of Agriculture detected Salmonella bacterial contamination in a bag of randomly tested pet food.

In fact, Salmonella was detected in a single package of EVO Turkey & Chicken Cat Food on March 15, 2013.

Late last Friday, P&G expanded its recall of Natura Pet Food Products for dogs and cats to include all products made at a Fremont, Nebraska production facility between January and March, 2013.

In addition, they announced that the Georgia Department of Agriculture confirmed the presence of Salmonella bacterial contamination in various other lots of their pet foods.

Pet food lines affected include California Natural, Innova, Evo, HealthWise and now Karma.

Natura Pet Food Recall Expands

A recent news release submitted by the FDA, confirmed, Salmonella was also discovered in other packages of EVO Turkey and Chicken Cat Food as well as in Innova Cat Treats.

It’s been a rough month for Procter & Gamble’s pet care division as initially a mold problem hurt the launch of their new Iams Shakeables pet product, then the Salmonella contamination issues followed.

These recent quality-control problems at Proctor and Gamble have arisen after years of declining sales for P&G’s pet care products. The fact is P&G still has not recovered financially from the Menu Pet Food Recall in 2007 in which Melamine contamination caused kidney failure and the subsequent death of thousands of innocent dogs and cats.

Despite the fact that no pet or human illnesses have been confirmed, taking precautionary measures is necessary to protect your pets and your family from Salmonella. Salmonella is a Zoonotic Disease which means it is easily transmissible to people and other pets.

Be sure to practice good hygiene by washing your hands well and sanitizing any and all surfaces the tainted pet food and it packaging may have contacted.

California Natural Recalled

Signs of Salmonella in dogs and cats include vomiting and diarrhea with or without blood, lethargy, appetite loss and fevers.

In humans, additional symptoms may include arthritis, Endocarditis, eye issues and urinary tract infections.

Pet owners who suspect their dog and/or cat may have been exposed should contact their veterinarian. Individuals who may have become sickened should contact their primary health care provider.

Pet owners who have purchased the tainted pet food should carefully discard the tainted food.

Natura representatives are available by phone Monday through Friday from 8 AM to 5:30PM CST. Pet owners interested in replacing the tainted pet foods may contact Natura directly by calling 1-800-224-6123.

It is noteworthy to mention the fact that despite P&G’s struggle to recover from the Menu Pet Food Recall in 2007, this is the third pet product-quality issue Procter and Gamble’s pet care division has experienced in the last two weeks since March 18, 2013.

This veterinarian questions the true aggressiveness of P&G’s quality control when it comes to their pet care division products. P&G offers pet food products for dogs and cats which are sold not only worldwide but also at major USA retailers and in veterinary offices.

Pet owners who wish to file a pet food complaint may do so online at FDA.gov/petfoodcomplaints.

Because the list of recalled pet foods and pet treats is so extensive, exact product codes and lot numbers of P&G’s recalled pet food products are available online at Natura dot com or at the Food and Drug Administrations pet food recalls section.

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat, a published author and a practicing, holistic veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients.

Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and makes homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats

Pet Food Recalled: Grain Free Brands for Dogs & Cats

Ask Dr. Carol, Cats, Dogs, Pet News, Pet Nutrition, Zoonotic Diseases No Comments »

Dogs

After testing positive for Salmonella bacterial contamination, by the Michigan Department of Agriculture, Natura Pet Products is recalling several lots of its dry pet food brands.

The recall affects California Natural, Evo, Innova and Healthwise dog and cat foods.

 

Salmonella bacterial diseases are Zoonotic which means they are easily transmitted between pets and people. Animals eating the tainted pet food are at risk as are pet owners.

Consumers who have handled the contaminated pet food should practice good hygiene; for example be sure hands are washed well.

Natura Pet Foods Recalled

Signs of Salmonella include vomiting and diarrhea with or without blood, lethargy, and fever and appetite loss.

Pet owners who suspect their dog and/or cat may have been affected should contact their veterinarian.

Certain pets may only experience abdominal cramping, fever and decreased appetite.

It is important to understand that some infected pets will appear completely normal and act as carriers able to transmit the disease to other pets and people.

Cats

In humans, Salmonella causes symptoms similar to those mentioned above for pets along with the possibility of arthritis, Endocarditis, urinary tract infections, and muscle pain and eye irritations.

Household members who fear contamination should contact their health care provider.

The recalled pet foods are being sold in veterinary clinics, at retail and online throughout the world.

Expiration dates on the recalled pet food lots range from December 17, 2013 to January 2, 2014.

Pet owners who purchased any of the recalled pet foods should discard them safely. Consumers with questions should contact Natura toll free at 1-800-224-6123 or visit them online at Naturapet.

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat, a published author and a practicing, holistic veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients.

Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and makes homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats

Pet Death Links Jerky Treats to Politics in USA & China

Ask Dr. Carol, Cats, Dogs, Pet News, Pet Nutrition No Comments »

Since 2007, chicken jerky treats from China have sickened over 3000 dogs and to date, more than 500 dogs have died as well as one cat. A Class Action law suit was filed in late 2012 by a devastated pet owner and is currently ongoing regarding these Chinese jerky treats.

Symptoms reported in pets that have eaten the Chinese made chicken jerky treats range from Fanconi Syndrome to Kidney failure.

Unfortunately even after a six year investigation, the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) remains unable to detect any issue responsible, or take any regulatory action other than recalling a recent batch of jerky treats due to the detection of antibiotic residues.

Currently, exportation of poultry from China to the United States is prohibited for humans. Reasons for the ban include previous food safety concerns, bird flu outbreaks, and even the frequent turnover of Chinese officials.

What is most interesting is that this importation ban does not apply to pet food or pet treats including these chicken jerky treats. Poultry such as chicken and turkey may be exported to America and may also be legally added to pet food and pet treats manufactured in China then re-packaged in the United States.

Now the most likely label most likely says, “Made in USA.”  With confusing pet labels like this, pet owners need to be aware that the only thing made in America was the label and package.

According to the FDA, US officials are currently trying to work with the Chinese government to develop a timeline to begin inspection of poultry-processing plants in China. Reports suggest that this may become a reality as early as this month.  Sadly the sudden spurt of initiative appears to be a step toward lifting the US ban on Chinese poultry for humans rather than an actual concern for pet health or safety.

Because the FDA has been unable to identify any actual contaminant in the jerky treats, they refuse to issue a recall.

The FDA and the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA)  have both issued warnings to pet owners about the potential risk of feeding jerky treats made by Nestlé’s Waggin’ Train, Canyon Creek Ranch treats and Del Monte’s Milo’s Kitchen Home-style Dog Treats.

Currently, several batches of Milo’s Kitchen’s Chicken Jerky and Chicken Griller’s treats have been recalled because of antibiotic residue detection.

On a political basis, future planned inspections might help to relieve trade related tension between China and the United States. To date the two countries have been battling through negotiations since 2007.

What’s the underlying reason for these negotiations?  The almighty dollar!

China wants to export poultry into the US for human consumption and America is anxious to re-institute exportation of US beef to China.

If we are able to lift the Beef Exportation Ban that has been in place since 2003 America stands to profit big time.

According to the National Cattleman’s Beef Association, beef ranchers and producers hope to export approximately

$200 million dollars of beef to China.

In addition it appears that in order for one ban to be lifted, the other must be lifted as well for negotiations to be successful.

This author and holistic veterinarian wonder where that leaves our beloved pets with respect to pet food and pet treat safety.

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat, a published author and a practicing, holistic veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients.

Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and makes homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats

 

 

 

The Anti-Aging “A” Natural Pet Supplement List for Your Dog & Cat

Ask Dr. Carol, Cats, Dogs, General Health, General Health, Pet Nutrition No Comments »

 

Vitamin A: The water soluble form which is called Vitamin A Palmitate is a vital antioxidant for your pet that enhances immunity, and is essential for your dog and cat to utilize protein in his or her diet.  Beware of supplements containing Retinyl Palmitate.

Retinyl Palmitate is the fat soluble form of Vitamin A. It accumulates in the body and can become toxic because unlike water soluble vitamins it is not eliminated daily in the urine. In addition cats are not able to convert Retinyl Palmitate to the active, usable form of Vitamin A.
Vitamin C: Ascorbic Acid is the form of Vitamin C that acts as an antioxidant. Vitamin C is needed for tissue growth and repair. It also enhances pet immunity and is needed for your pet’s body to utilize Vitamin E.
Vitamin E: Vitamin E is one of the four fat soluble vitamins along with Vitamin A, D, and K. Vitamin E acts as an antioxidant. It also prevents heart disease, promotes wound healing, needed for your dog and cat’s body to utilize Vitamin C.
B-Complex Vitamins: As a group, B vitamins help your dog to maintain healthy nerves, skin and muscle. B-Vitamins are needed to provide energy to the body. Beware of supplements containing Brewer’s Yeast!

Brewer’s Yeast is a leading cause of allergies and itching in dogs and cats and is commonly used to provide low cost, inferior quality B Vitamins.
Coenzyme Q-10: A powerful, antioxidant which is found in the highest quantities in your pet’s heart. CoQ10 is essential for your pet’s immune function and is not only, beneficial for heart function but in Europe is used to treat heart disease.
Alpha Lipoic Acid: This antioxidant is both water and fat soluble and helps your dog to restore energy metabolism.
Selenium: Selenium is an essential mineral that works with Vitamin E to help your pet combat infection, by boosting internal Immunity. Selenium also acts an antioxidant and is beneficial to your pet’s skin and hair coat. Deficiencies of Selenium have been linked to cancer and heart disease.

Zinc: Zinc is an essential mineral pet’s need for protein synthesis. Zinc promotes healthy immune systems; an aid wound healing and is critical for hundreds of biological processes in your dog and cat’s body.
Omega-3 Fatty Acids: Omega-3 fatty Acids are essential components of cell membranes in your pet and are vital to healthy heart and brain function along with maintenance of dog and cat skin and hair coats.
Bioflavonoids: Bioflavonoids enhances the absorption of Vitamin C, have antioxidant effects, promote normal blood circulation and combat allergies for your dog and cat.
Glucosamine and Methyl-Sulfonyl-Methane (MSM): Both of these naturally occurring nutrients promote strong healthy bones, joints and cartilage for your dog and cat.
Digestive Enzymes: Digestive Enzymes are essential to life. There are five essential digestive enzymes pets require: Amylase to digest carbohydrates, protease to digest protein, lipase to digest fat, Cellulase to digest cellulose or plant fiber and lactose to digest lactase which is milk protein. Digestive Enzymes are manufactured in your pet’s pancreas and are vital to digest dietary nutrients for dogs and cats.
Melatonin: Melatonin is a naturally occurring amino acid found in highest concentration in your pet’s brain. Melatonin is the chief nutrient responsible for maintaining the health and wellness of the brain. It also combats Alzheimer’s and senility. In addition, it acts as an immune modulator and an antioxidant, triggering restful sleep for your dog and cat.
Ginseng: Ginseng has been used in Europe for centuries as a natural energizing herbal tonic which also promotes brain health and overall wellness for your dog and cat.
L-Glutamine: This is the primary amino acid needed for your dog and cat to energize the cells of their digestive system so dietary nutrients can be properly absorbed from the intestines and utilized after they have been digested in the stomach.
Colostrum: The first milk your puppy and kitten receive from their mother. Colostrum provides your dog and cat with their initial antibodies to protect him or her against disease and aid in immune system function.
Exercise: 20 minutes twice a day minimum for your dog. Ten minutes of playtime 4 times a day works well for cats.
Balanced, natural diet: Feed your dog and cat at least two meals daily. Fresh organic and natural nutrient sources are best.
Relaxation: Stress and anxiety affect pets and people adversely and elevated the aging hormone called Cortisol. Set aside an hour a day to relax and enjoy your dog and cat. Consider massage, yoga and music.
Positive mental attitude: The mind-body connection is a potent promoter of well-being for you as well as your dog and cat.
Pure water: Fresh, non-chlorinated preferably distilled water is essential for people and best for your dog and cat. Fresh water should be available at all times 24/7.

 

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat, a published author and a practicing, holistic veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients.

Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and makes homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats

Pet Treats Recalled Due to Mold

Ask Dr. Carol, Dogs, Pet News, Pet Nutrition No Comments »

Claudia’s Canine Cuisine has issued a voluntary recall of 3 varieties of their pet treats. Sold in 7.5 ounce bags, Dog Candy Holiday Hound Cake and Blueberry Hound Cake are the three pet treats for which they issued this recall.

The packages were distributed to 130 Pet Smart stores in 36 states and have a “best buy” date of 08/2015.

Apparently the treats were packaged while they were still warm and this led to moisture concerns.

Excessive moisture attracts various pathogens especially Salmonella bacteria.

After closer inspection by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), mold was found on several of the cakes that had already been delivered to Pet Smart stores.

Claudia’s Canine Cuisine has reportedly implemented new procedures to correct the issue and help avoid its re-occurrence.

Despite any current reports of sickened dogs, pet owners are advised to discard the tainted treats.

The tainted pet treats may also be returned them to Pet Smart for a full refund. Consumers may also contact the Claudia’s Cuisine directly by calling 1-501-851-0002.

Consumers are also advised to practice good hygiene and wash their hands well and be sure to separate and sanitize pet bowls.

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat, a published author and a practicing, holistic veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients.

Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and makes homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats

Wellness Pet Food Recall & Solutions

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Wellness has issued a recall of one of its wellness dog food recipes. The recall applies specifically to the 12 pound bags of Wellness Small Breed Adult Health dry dog food. High moisture content was cited as the problem. Excessive moisture leads to mold formation and the manufacturer was aware of the fact that this could cause mold formation to occur prior to the product expiration date.

Due to Hurricane Sandy, the company, its website and servers, suffered severe damage and they are working around the clock to restore their facility and facilitate communication.

Pet owners who have purchased the tainted dog food are welcome to contact the company directly at 800-225-0904 or email them at info@wellpet.com for replacement product at this time. Apparently refunds are not being offered.

According to Wellpet LLC., the company that owns Wellness, consumers whose dogs have eaten the product should not suffer any health consequences, nor have any instances of sickened canines been reported yet.

Tired of all these pet food recalls? So, what’s the solution?

Consider making home-made dog food. Simply, divide your pet’s meal plan into thirds. Make 1/3: lean protein, 1/3 long acting carbohydrates and the final third fiber or fresh vegetables.

Lean protein choices include meat such as chicken, turkey, beef, veal, duck and venison. Other types of lean protein include fish, tofu and eggs.

Choices for long acting carbohydrates include rice, barley, potatoes, pasta, noodles and macaroni.

Vegetable choices to fulfill the fiber category include broccoli, cauliflower, asparagus, peas, green beans, spinach, carrots and more.

Choose one item from each category, cook according to personal preference, mix together and then remember dogs like food that smells good, so season it up. The top three flavors most dogs enjoy are barbecue sauce, pasta or tomato sauce and low sodium Tamari sauce.

Proportions to feed your dog match those of commercial diets. For dogs with allergies it’s fine to eliminate the carbohydrates so just make the meal 50/50; half protein and half fresh vegetables.

How do you balance your dog’s home-made diet?

Simply add a comprehensive pet vitamin-mineral supplement and give that daily according to the directions.

Pet owners that are not sure about how to choose the best pet supplement for their dog should ask their veterinarian for a recommendation.

Home-made pet diets take a little extra time and preparation but the results are well worth the effort.

Try it for a month and decide for yourself.

Many pet owners not only experience excellent results but also save a few dollars in the process.

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat, a published author and a practicing, holistic veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients. Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and makes homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats

 

 

Certain Pet Nutritional Supplements Not Beneficial

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Most of us are familiar with the many health benefits of pet nutritional supplements for dogs and cats. On the other hand there are certain pet supplements that are not only less than beneficial to pet health they are actually detrimental.

A study of 40 dogs and 40 cats was conducted to determine the value of various antioxidants, vitamins and minerals with respect to pet health and longevity.

Ultimately the scientists found that although many supplements were beneficial, certain nutrients, specifically iron, copper, and phosphorus were found to accelerate the pet aging process and reduce wellness and longevity in dogs and cats.

Phosphorus in particular can lead to and precipitate kidney disorders. In dogs and cats with compromised kidney function, phosphorus worsens pet kidney function.

The association between supplement intake and mortality was highest with iron.

Read labels and remember more is not always better.

Give your pets supplements wisely and always check with your veterinarian to find out what’s best for your pet.

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat, a published author and a practicing, holistic veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients. Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and makes homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats

Pet Aging & the Benefits of Vitamin C

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Despite the fact that your dog’s body naturally produces small amounts of Vitamin C, recent research indicates that supplementing your canines diet with additional sources of Vitamin C can significantly impact your pet’s health, wellness and aging process.

Todays recommended dietary allowance which is referred to as the RDA was initially developed to prevent the development of gross nutritional deficiency diseases such as scurvy and rickets in institutionalized individuals. The RDA was never developed to promote or maintain normal health much less optimal health or wellness.

Recently published studies suggest that supplemental sources of Vitamin C added to the canine daily diet offer many additional health benefits. Because Vitamin C is a biological antioxidant, it naturally acts as a free radical scavenger lowering levels of oxidative damage to your dogs cells and tissues. In other words, Vitamin C helps to protect your dogs body from free radical damage much like anti-corrosive’s help to prevent rust.

Not only does this potentially contribute to increased quality of life for dogs on a daily basis but optimal intake may also play an important role in the prevention of chronic or long term diseases your dog may be predisposed to and encounter as he or she ages. These chronic diseases include disorders from arthritis and diabetes to heart failure, high blood pressure, immune deficiency disorders and cancer.

In humans whose bodies do not naturally manufacture Vitamin C, according to the Linus Pauling Institute and the National Institute of Health, todays suggested daily dosages are more than double that initially proposed by the standard RDA.

In pets similar protocols are gaining acceptance by Alternative and Holistic veterinary practitioners and with time it is hopeful that traditional mainstream veterinary medicine will take notice of these emerging pet nutritional trends as well.

What choices does a dog owner have?

Supplementing your dog’s diet with Vitamin C is easy. Vitamin C is available in a variety of forms from standardized, over the counter supplements as well as directly from food sources including oranges and orange juice. Frozen orange juice cubes taste great and make wonderful healthy summertime treats as does adding a bit of fresh O.J. to your dog’s water bowl. On the other hand offering your canine a few fresh orange slices is a low cal, tasty snack that’s healthy.

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat and a practicing holistic veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients. Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.
Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

 
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