ALERT: Popular Pet Product Killing Dogs

Ask Dr. Carol, Dogs, Pet News, Seizures-Epliepsy 1 Comment »

Trifexis KILLS Puppies

Pet owners from coast to coast are up in arms about a popular, once a month, chewable,  pet product used to prevent fleas, heartworms and intestinal parasites in dogs.

The product is made by Elanco, a division of Eli Lilly and is called Trifexis. Apparently in addition to killing the fleas and heartworms, Trifexis is also killing the dogs and puppies.

Despite hitting the pet market less than 3 years ago, over 50 million doses of Trifexis have been dispensed. The Food and Drug Administration, (FDA) reports that since April 2013, nearly 2500 cases of dog vomiting, 600 cases of lethargy and 31 cases of dog deaths have been filed.

That is approximately 1 adverse case per month, which is astonishing to this author and veterinarian.

Trifexis

Dog owners are so upset by this, a facebook page, entitled Trifexis KILLS dogs has been set up on which concerned owners are able to voice their concerns.

It is noteworthy to understand that Trifexis is made up of 2 active drugs, Spinosad and Milbemycin.

According to an Elanco spokesman, Spinosad is made in the USA, however Milbemycin is sourced from China.

That fact, according to Elanco is a “non-issue.”

They further stated that the Chinese manufacturer of Milbemycin has been inspected several times and no violations have been reported.

Dog itching Fleas

It is interesting to note that a situation, similar to that with Trifexis, has been going on with Chinese Pet Jerky treats sold for dogs for the last 6 years.

The FDA has been investigating the Chinese Pet Jerky Treat Mystery since 2007. Despite reports of over 3000 dead dogs, once again, not only have the pet Jerky Treats never been recalled or removed from pet retailer shelves, not even a single clue has been detected as to why dogs eating Chinese jerky treats continue to suffer with health issues ranging from Kidney Failure and Fanconi Syndrome to lethargy and death.

Symptoms reported in dogs that received Trifexis include vomiting and lethargy as well as neurological signs including seizures and vertigo.

In addition, dogs have suffered elevated temperatures up to 106 degrees Fahrenheit, which are incompatible with canine life, as well as heart damage and sudden death with no signs. Other pet owner reports indicate that several dogs and puppies have died spontaneously without signs anywhere from 6 days to 3 weeks after being given Trifexis.

It is interesting to note that the warning printed on the Trifexis label indicates the possibility of MILD side effects in dogs.

Trifexis Add

The exact Trifexis package verbage states “Side effects that may occur include vomiting. If vomiting occurs within one hour of administration, re-dose with another full dose. Other side effects may occur. Continue giving Trifexis chewable tablets and talk to your veterinarian if your pet experiences decreased appetite, lethargy or decreased activity, diarrhea, cough, increased thirst, vocalization, increased appetite, redness of the skin, hyperactivity and excessive salivation. Talk to your veterinarian about any side effect that seems unusual or especially bothersome to the pet.”

This veterinarian finds it noteworthy that even on the Trifexis label, pet owners are instructed to continue giving the product to their pets even if they experience adverse side effects. In fact, the label states that if a dog vomits within 1 hour of receiving Trifexis, dog owners should repeat the entire dose immediately!  Believe it or not, that’s actually printed on the label!

Again this veterinarian finds it noteworthy to recall the case with Vetsulin. Vetsulin is a type of insulin sold for pet diabetics. The FDA issued an Alert about Vetsulin, saying certain batches were “unstable.” Therefore, blood sugar levels might fluctuate causing dogs to suffer adverse effects but pet owners were instructed to continue giving it to pets while keeping a close eye on them.  Many pet owners remember that Vetsulin ended up killing thousands of diabetic dogs. A few years ago there was a multi-million dollar Vetsulin Class Action Law Suit, which was settled out of court. Today, Vetsulin is back on the market. Buyer Beware!

In addition, it is important to understand that excessive salivation in dogs and cats, is in many cases, a  ”pre-ictal” sign, which is another way of saying it’s a sign of an impending epileptic seizure. As noted in this article, many of the adverse reactions reported for Trifexis include seizures, yet no where on the label does it warn pet owners to avoid the drug if their pet is prone to and/or suffers from epileptic seizures.

Despite being aware of the risk of Trifexis causing pet epileptic seizures in dogs, the Elanco spokesman said they have not found any connection between Trifexis and dog deaths.

Connell, an Elanco spokesman, said, “We don’t like the fact that it has killed any dogs. But with any pharmaceutical product, we understand that the very rare sensitivities, allergic events — those types of things are going to happen.” This statement was later revised to state that;” the company doesn’t like hearing reports of any dog deaths.”

Certainly using safe medications to prevent pet fleas and heartworms is a valid concern for dog and cat owners. So, why not be proactive, do a little homework and ask your veterinarian to recommend a preventative flea-tick-heart-worm preparation that is safe and effective for your pet. Remember, there are also a variety of natural dog flea preventatives available, some of which work remarkably well in this veterinarians experience.

In the meantime, this author and veterinarian plan to steer clear of Trifexis. The risks definitely do not outweigh the potential benefits when it comes to Trifexis and the health of our beloved canine companions!

About Dr. Carol

Integrative Veterinarian Dr. Carol Osborne, DVM

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Health Diplomat, a published author and a practicing, integrative veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She offers traditional and natural, alternative therapies for dogs and cats. She welcomes new canine and feline patients.

Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and creates homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats.

 

Join Veterinarian Dr. Carol at the Holistic Health & Healing Expo

Ask Dr. Carol, Cats, Dogs, Pet News 2 Comments »

Join Integrative Veterinarian Dr. Carol Osborne, DVM, at the 2013 Holistic Health and Healing Expo

Dogs & Cats

When: Saturday & Sunday: October 19 & 20, 2013

Time: 11 AM-6 PM EST

Where: Soccer Sportsplex located at 31515 Lorain Rd., North Olmsted OH 44070

This year, the 25000 square foot sports complex features nearly 100 vendors and practitioners,

in addition to 4 lecture areas and a kids zone.

Look forward to all kinds of freebies and give-a-ways along with raffles and a concert.

Tickets are $8 at the door, and are available online, donations are tax deductible.

Integrative veterinarian Dr. Carol Osborne, DVM, will be speaking on Saturday, October 19th at from 3-3:50 PM EST, in Room A.

Dr. Carol will be discussing Holistic Pet Therapies for Dogs & Cats, after which she will offer a Q & A session open to all pet lovers.

About Dr. Carol

Holistic Veterinarian Dr. Carol Osborne, DVM

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Health Diplomat, a published author and a practicing, integrative veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio. She offers traditional and natural, alternative therapies for dogs and cats.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients.

Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and creates homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats.

 

The ABC’s of Canine Heart Disease Detection

Ask Dr. Carol, Dogs, Heart Disease, Pet News No Comments »

If you and/or your veterinarian suspect your dog has a heart problem because for example a heart murmur was detected and/or your pet is experiencing classic cardiac signs such as coughing, weakness and lethargy, diagnostic tests will be required to confirm the presence and severity of your dog’s heart disease.

Kids love pets

Diagnostic tests to detect canine heart disease usually include comprehensive blood panels, a urinalysis, chest x-rays and an EKG and/or cardiac ultrasound. This can get quite expensive running into several hundred or more dollars.

For many pet owners who want to be proactive in detecting their dog’s heart health status, the expense of these tests is prohibitive.

It’s literally a heart breaking situation!

Dogs

Any pet owner, who’s suffered the loss of a dog and/or cat to heart disease, is bound to wonder and worry whether or not it might strike again. So, it’s only natural to try to take proactive steps with your current canine companion to protect his or her heart and avoid this disease from happening again.
What about dog owners that just can’t afford the cost?

Most pet owners feel helpless as though that they have no choice but to sit and wait to find out whether or not heart disease will sneak up to silently to claim another four-legged member of their family.

That is, until now.

A Blood Test for Early Detection of Pet Heart Disease in Dogs & Cats

Great news!

A blood test is now available that can identify which dogs and cats are at greatest risk for heart disease and heart failure.

The test is called a proBNP test. BNP is called B-type Natriuretic Peptide.
The proBNP is a blood test that measures how much of a particular peptide hormone is released by the heart and is circulating in your pet’s body. Note that this peptide hormone is only released when your pet’s heart is pushed beyond its capacity.

In the early stages of heart disease and failure, small amounts of this peptide are released into your pet’s bloodstream, and it’s presence is a this test detects telling you that steps must be taken in order to preserve your pet’s heart health.

As your pet’s heart disease continues to progress, the blood value of this peptide hormone will continue to rise.

Sampson

How to Proactively Protect Your Pet’s Heart Health

1. Ask your veterinarian for the proBNP blood test if you’re concerned about your pet’s heart for any reason at all.

2. The proBNP blood test offers pet owners peace of mind knowing that their pet has no early detectable signs of heart disease.

It also helps your veterinarian to differentiate between, for example, a respiratory condition like asthma and an underlying heart condition.

The proBNP test is a simple blood test with a fast turn-around time that can provide the information you need to proactively manage your dog’s or cat’s heart health.
Pet owners may also elect to have the test repeated as often as needed to chart progress in meeting your pet’s cardiovascular health needs throughout his or her life time.

3. Meet your Pet’s Co-Enzyme-Q10 Needs
Co-Enzyme Q10 is a naturally occurring enzyme that young dogs and cats have in abundance within their heart. As pets increase in age, their body’s ability to produce CoQ10 naturally decreases.

What Can Pet Owners Do to Ensure Heart Healthy Levels of Vital Canine Nutrients?

Supplement your pet’s diet daily with the amino acids, Taurine and Carnitine along with Coenzyme Q10.

Offering your pet supplemental Co-Enzyme Q10 each day helps to insure your dog or cat has the quantity needed to maintain a healthy heart. It also helps to reduce the risk of heart disease for dogs and cats predisposed to the condition for example, because of breed and genetics.

Co-Enzyme Q10 supplements come in a variety of forms, Ubiquinone and Ubiqunol, being most common. Ubiquinol is a reduced form of Co-Enzyme Q10 and is the supplement recommended for most pets.

What’s the Best Dose of Co-Enzyme Q10 to Prevent Pet Heart Disease?
30 mg per day for cats and small dogs
50 mg per day for medium sized dogs
100 mg twice per day for large dogs

Dr. Carol’s Tip: The recommended dosage of Co-Enzyme Q10 for pets with heart disease and/or heart failure is usually doubled.

Integrative Veterinarian Dr. Carol Osborne, DVM & "Tucker"

About Dr. Carol
Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Health Diplomat, a published author and a practicing, integrative veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio. She welcomes new canine and feline patients.

Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and creates homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.
Bookmark carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats.

Veterinarian Featured at American Heart Association’s Cleveland Heart Walk Canine Corner

Ask Dr. Carol, Dogs, General Health, Pet News No Comments »

American Heart Association
The American Heart Association proudly announces the Canine Corner and Heart Health Walk!

Integrative Veterinarian Dr. Carol Osborne, DVM will be the featured speaker at this event.

Kids love dogs

Grab your leash and join us:

When:Saturday September 28, 2013

Where: Voinovich Park, 800 East 9th Street, Cleveland, Ohio 44114

What Time: 8Am to 12 Noon EST

Where: Voinovich Park, 800 East 9th Street, Cleveland, Ohio 44114

Admission: FREE for Dogs & their People

Enjoy this is FREE, fun filled healthy heart event dog owners can share with their canines.
People and their pets both benefit by updating their Pet Heart Health IQ!

Everyone has the opportunity to bone up on their Canines Heart Health, get lots of freebies, and stroll proudly with their pooch on the Canine Walk.

The Cleveland Heart Walk will be 1 mile long and for those people and pets fit and in top notch condition, there is a 3 mile option.

Freebies available include Pet Spa Gift Cards, Canine Clinics, Grooming and Boarding Gift Certificates, Dog Toys and Much more!

For more information contact the American Heart Association online at AmericanHeart.org, or by call their toll free phone at 1-800-282-0291

Dogs Chemically Neutered with a Shot

Ask Dr. Carol, Dogs, General Health, Pet News No Comments »

Traditionally, neutering a male dog required anesthesia and surgery, both of which come with a variety of risks.

But what if your dog could be neutered without surgery or anesthesia?
Dog Neuter Surgery

A new procedure referred to as “Chemical Dog Neutering” is now being offered by a handful of veterinary clinics. The dogs are neutered by receiving a injection given directly into each testicle.

Although the thought of this makes some people flinch, because a dog’s testicles have no nerves, the procedure is basically painless.

According to a study published in the American Journal of Veterinary Research, complications are rare and recovery time is short.

Restricting your dog’s activity 3-5 days after the injection is the current recommendation.

The manufacturer, Ark Sciences, reports that over the last 2 years, approximately 3000 dogs have already undergone the procedure. The injection which is sold under the name Zeuterin is actually a solution of zinc gluconate.  Zeuterin is FDA approved for puppies 3 to 10 months old.

The injection kills sperm and scars the dog’s testicles resulting in permanent canine sterility within 30 days.

Sedation is not required but is an option available many dog owners elect, to help avoid discomfort.

Dog Neuter Traditional Post Op

The testicles shrink in size and become a bit more firm after the injection, but still remain visible to the eye. Dog owners previously worried about their dog’s appearance post-op, no longer have to consider Neuticle’s or testicular implants for cosmetic purposes.

The production of Testosterone, which is the male sex hormone produced by the testicles is greatly reduced but not completely eliminated. The value of this is that canine behavioral issues, aggression and urine marking are eliminated but low levels of Testosterone still circulate through the bloodstream. Believe it or not this is excellent!

Why?…. because Testosterone is a vital hormone  that helps to protect and maintain many aspects of your dog’ s health and wellness, including his bones and joints as well as the heart, muscles and brain.

It is valid to understand that before a veterinarian can be approved to give this drug, he or she must undergo 5 hours of training. Complications after the injection are rare as previously stated, but improper injection technique as well as improper care post injection can lead to severe tissue damage as well as scrotal ulcers. Note that similar complications can occur after traditional canine neutering as well.

Dogs that have been neutered with this injection wear a special tag on their collar and in addition are tattooed in their groin area with a green Z.

Representatives from the manufacturer, Ark Sciences, expect the drug which was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in August of 2012, to become widely available to low-cost spay and neuter clinics and private veterinary practice clinics by the end of this year or very early in 2014.

At this time there is not a similar product available for female dogs. Oral contraceptives are being tested but none yet have been 100% effective.

Veterinarian Dr. Carol Osborne, DVM & "Tucker"

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Health Diplomat, a published author and a practicing, integrative veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients. Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and creates homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats.

Pet Antioxidants Promote Pet Health in Dogs & Cat’s

Ask Dr. Carol, Cats, Dogs, Pet News, Pet Nutrition No Comments »

For the last 10 years, the word antioxidant has become part of our vocabulary. Pet Antioxidants are widely recognized as one of the most important weapons in the battle against pet disease. All the physiological processes in pets and people require oxygen, which provides us with energy.

Dogs Enjoy Veggies

How Antioxidants Benefit Pets Health

Unfortunately the byproducts of burning oxygen, which are similar to the sparks given off by a fire, are also produced in your pet’s body. These little sparks are commonly known as free radicals, and are the major cause of aging and degenerative disease in both people and pets.

Pet Antioxidants counteract the damaging effects of these everyday physiological processes in your pet’s body, by combating and eliminating these free radicals.

Dogs & Antioxidants: What are Pet Antioxidants?

Pet Antioxidants are the vitamins, minerals and enzymes that play a vital role in preventing the onset of chronic pet diseases such as cancer, diabetes, heart disease, dementia and canine Cognitive Dysfunction Syndrome (Alzheimer’s disease) along with canine arthritis, allergies and cataracts in dogs and cats.

Your pet’s body undergoes oxidative  stress when the capability of these antioxidants is overwhelmed by the number of free radicals being produced. Free radicals are continually formed in the body as part of normal biological processes, but other factors can contribute to an overload, such as pesticides, antibiotics, cigarette smoke, pollution, alcohol and foods that are fried at high temperatures or burnt.

Cats Need Antioxidants

Cats & Antioxidants

It’s believed that a human cell is exposed to roughly 100,000 free radical hits per second. The role of antioxidants is to ‘mop up’ free radicals. Natural, nutrient-rich foods and certain supplements, including Vitamin E and Co-enzyme Q10, have pet antioxidant benefits. They help to fight pet aging by attacking free radicals that would normally attack DNA, proteins and other body tissues in your pet. Carnosine, which is a natural amino acid, also counteracts the harmful effects of sugar on body proteins, while repairing any existing damage.

Pet Antioxidants help to keep your pet’s immune system strong. Glucosamine and MSM are powerful, naturally-occurring antioxidants in your pet’s body. Unfortunately, their levels peak as early as the age of two in pets and at the age of ten in people, after which time they decline by roughly 15 percent each decade. That’s why Glucosamine and MSM supplements are also routinely recommended by doctors and veterinarians to help patients recover from musculoskeletal injuries. Their anti-inflammatory properties provide significant relief from the debilitating effects of human and pet arthritis.

Antioxidant Rich Pet Foods

It’s also important to increase protein, fish oils, seeds, nuts, herbs, fruits and vegetables in your pet’s diet, and to limit sugar intake. Feeding nutritious pet foods can reduce the overall risk of heart, kidney and liver disease as well as diabetes, arthritis, cataracts, allergies and a range of other age-related pet diseases experienced by dogs and cats.

A team of nutritionists recently published a study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, outlining a number of common foods that have high levels of antioxidant qualities, using ORAC, or the oxygen radical absorbance capacity.

 

Top Antioxidant Rich Food Sources for Pets & People

 

Small red beans (or Mexican red bean – dried)

Blueberries (wild and cultivated)

Red kidney beans

Pinto beans

Cranberries

Blackberries

Prunes

Raspberries

Strawberries

Red delicious apples

Granny Smith apples

Pecans

Black plums

Russet potatoes (cooked)

Black beans (dried)

Plums

Gala apples

Cabbage

Broccoli

Wheat

Barley grasses

 

As a nutritional researcher and practicing integrative veterinarian, I recommend feeding dogs and cats as balanced a diet as possible so they can benefit from a wide range of antioxidant nutrients. For example, raspberries and strawberries contain ellagitannin, a substance that helps prevent the growth of cancerous cells. Pecans contain copper and potassium. Pinto and kidney beans contain high amount of folate, or vitamin B9, which lowers homocysteine levels, implicated in heart disease. Blueberries contain anthocyanin’s, shown to protect brain cells.

Veggies Benefit Dogs

Most antioxidant rich foods lose some of their antioxidant properties when processed, the exception being tomatoes. Tomatoes contain lycopene, which is actually enhanced by cooking.

But pet diets alone does not appear to be sufficient to maintain your dog or cat’s ideal antioxidant levels, so adding balanced, comprehensive, USA sourced, pet nutritional supplements to your dog and cat’s diet daily is vital.

Dr Carol Osborne, DVM

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat, a published author and a practicing, integrative veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients.

Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and makes homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark www.drcarol.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats

 

 

 

 

 

New Dog Bone Cancer Therapy Offers Hope for Humans

Ask Dr. Carol, Cancer, Dogs, Pet News 6 Comments »

Researchers at Auburn University are testing a new dog bone cancer therapy that holds hope for humans with the same condition.  This new dog bone cancer therapy consists of injecting a virus normally used in the Canine Hepatitis Vaccine.

Dog Bone Cancer

This canine hepatitis vaccine virus is modified in the lab so that it only duplicates itself when it is actually inside the cancer cell.

Once the virus is injected and enters the cancer cell, it causes the cancer cell to rupture and die; at the same time it releases thousands of copies of itself, which then attack and kill the remaining cancer cells.

According to the Bruce Smith, director of the Research Team, they found a way to turn the cancer cell into a factory producing more and more viral particles so that in essence the cancer cell becomes an “agent of its own death.”

Canine Hepatitis Vaccine Virus

Once they are able to confirm that this new viral therapy works as expected for dog bone cancer, they hope to create a single therapy that is able to treat multiple types of canine cancer.

Canine bone cancer affects approximately five percent of dogs.

In over 90 percent of the cases, even with amputation of the affected limb, the cancer spreads to the lungs and dogs typically survive less than nine to twelve months, even with chemotherapy.

Canine bone cancer survival rates are very poor.

Thanks to a two year grant from the American Kennel Club, Canine Health Foundation, this new study plans to accept 20 dogs with bone cancer. All dogs must be referred by their veterinarian and all must have all four legs intact, so cancer cell can be collected for the study. These dogs will be treated and monitored for two years.

Auburn Univ. Dog Cancer Researchers

Ultimately, the team plans to take the knowledge gained from treating bone cancer in dogs to create new human cancer treatments.

They are planning to partner with various medical colleges to run clinical trials in human cancer cases based on the initial results in dogs.

The Auburn University Research Initiative in Cancer, operates according to a concept called “One Medicine.”

One Medicine views pet and human health as one field whereby discoveries in one species such as a dog, acts to offer health advancements in humans as well.

One Medicine

According to Smith, “Dogs are physically very similar to people.”

In addition, the types of cancer and genetic mutations affecting dogs are quite similar to those affecting people.

Consequently what researchers discover in dogs is in most cases very applicable to people.

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat, a published author and a practicing, holistic veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients.

Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and makes homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats

 

Pet Food Recalls Expand: Natura and BARF World Dog & Cat Foods

Ask Dr. Carol, Cats, Dogs, Pet News, Zoonotic Diseases No Comments »

Golden Retriever

Natura Pet Products once again has expanded its dry pet food recall to include all sizes and lots of dry cat food, dog food and pet treats with expiration dates up to and including March 29, 2013. Salmonella bacterial contamination has been cited as the cause of the expanded pet food recall.

Recalled pet foods affected include California Natural, Evo, Innova, Healthwise and Karma.

The Michigan and Georgia Departments of Agriculture conducted testing on Natura’s pet foods and detected the presence of Salmonella bacteria.

The Natura pet foods are sold worldwide through veterinary clinics, online and at retail in America and Canada as well as in Japan and Australia.

Pet owners who purchased the recalled pet foods should carefully discard them. Consumers may contact Natura directly for additional information.

Consumers who purchased any of Natura’s recalled pet food products should discard them and contact Natura for a refund at 1-800-224-6123.

Natura Pet Food Recall Expands

In addition to Natura’s pet food recall. BARF World, a manufacturer of raw pet food has also issued a recall due to a salmonella bacterial outbreak in their manufacturing facility.

The BARF World raw pet food recall directly affects the Lamb and Combo patties, with a “best buy” date of July 27, 2013.

Note that neither company claims to have received any reports of sickened pets at this time.

Pet owners should discard the tainted raw pet food and may contact BARF World toll free at 866-282-2273 for refunds and details.

 

Salmonella bacteria diseases are Zoonotic which means they are easily transmitted between pets, pet food and people. Suggestions to avoid contamination include practicing good hygiene.

BARF World Pet Food Recall

Wash your hands well, carefully discard tainted pet foods and sanitize pet food bowls and any surfaces that may have come into contact with the tainted pet food or its packaging.

Signs of Salmonella in dogs and cats include vomiting and diarrhea with or without blood, lethargy, appetite loss and fevers.

In humans additions symptoms may include Endocarditis, urinary tract infections, arthritis and eye problems.

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat, a published author and a practicing, holistic veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients.

Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and makes homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats

 

 

 

 

Dogs’ Born Blind Regain Vision

Ask Dr. Carol, Dogs, Pet News, The Eyes No Comments »

Dogs born blind from birth are now able to regain full vision, regardless of age.

Golden Retriever Pups

According to a recent publication in the Journal of Molecular Therapy, researchers at Michigan State University combined two therapies which reversed an inherited form of total color blindness in dogs, called Achromatopsia.

Although the study focused on dogs this novel therapy may prove effective in helping people regain vision who also suffer with this form of hereditary color blindness.

According to veterinary ophthalmologist Andras Komáromy, DVM, gene therapy only works if the cells in the eye that process daylight and color are not totally degenerated.

Therefore they used a protein called CNTF to selectively destroy the eye’s light sensitive cells, which vets call photoreceptor cells. At the proper dose, its similar to pruning flowers, the protein partially destroys the cells but at the same time it allows for new growth.

BeagleCanine Gene therapy follows the protein injection and replaces the mutant gene associated with the blindness. The results have been overwhelmingly successful. All seven dogs in the study regained full vision.

Dr. Komáromy, an associate professor in Michigan States Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, was amazed at their success.

Although Achromatopsia is a rare condition, it’s a good model disease for other ocular disorders affecting the photoreceptors cells of the eye, which detect color.

These photoreceptor eye disorders, on the other hand do constitute a major cause of incurable blindness in dogs and humans.

Because of the tremendous success of this therapy, new treatment concepts are currently being investigated for Retinal Therapy Disorders causing blindness in pets and people.

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat, a published author and a practicing, holistic veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients.

Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and makes homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats

VETSULIN ALERT: Dog Diabetes Drug Killed Thousands Yet Back on Pet Market

Ask Dr. Carol, Cats, Diabetes, Diabetes, Dogs, Pet News No Comments »

Vetsulin was originally marketed by Merck Animal Health, in 2004, as the first federally approved insulin for diabetic dogs and cats. After Vetsulin killed thousands of helpless dogs, it was finally discontinued in 2011 and just recently has been re-approved by the FDA. Vetsulin is now available to US veterinarians and diabetic pet owners.

Golden Retriever

Vetsulin is an insulin zinc suspension, of porcine origin which means it is derived from pigs.

According to Merck, the amino acid structure in Vetsulin is identical to canine insulin which Merck representatives said minimizes the risk of potential adverse immune mediated disorders resulting from its use in dogs. Diabetes in cats, on the other hand is not thought to be an immune mediated disorder therefore the risk of developing auto-antibodies is negligent.

In 2009, the FDA issued alerts regarding a lack of stability in Vetsulin. Pet owners were advised to keep a close eye on their diabetic pets in case of an adverse reaction. Following this initial FDA Alert, thousands of diabetic dogs were rushed into emergency rooms all across the country, suffering from the consequences of this unstable Vetsulin.

Results included kidney failure, anemia, and blindness due to cataracts, neurological disorders and death.

There was also a multi million dollar Vetsulin Class Action Law Suit filed and settled out of court in which some of the financial burdens experienced by grieving pet owners were addressed.

Vetsulin

Since Vetsulin was officially taken off the market in 2011, diabetic dogs and cats have been doing quite well on human DNA derived insulin, available for example, at Wal-Mart for a fraction of the cost when compared to Vetsulin.

Adverse reactions experienced by diabetic dogs taking human insulin have yet to be documented or even reported, according to this veterinarian and author’s knowledge.

According to Merck, the number of diabetic pets is currently exploding and in dogs has tripled over the last 30 years.

Merck says the stability and sterility issues in Vetsulin issues have been fully addressed, and FDA approval has been obtained to reintroduce Vetsulin to the US pet market.

Vetsulin, referred to as Caninsulin in Canada and other countries outside of the United States, has been used to treat diabetic dogs and cats overseas for more than 20 years.

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat, a published author and a practicing, holistic veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients.

Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and makes homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats

 

 
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