Top Pet Emergency Conditions in 2011

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Whether you and your pets are heading over the river or through the woods this holiday season, remember keeping a close eye on Fido and Fluffy help to keep the holidays safe and healthy for all. According to Veterinary Pet Insurance, in 2011 pet policy holders spent nearly 25 million dollars on holiday associated veterinary medical conditions.

Out of 485,000 insured pets here are the leading pet health emergency conditions reported last year:

Gastritis is also called vomiting. Vomiting was reported to be associated with pets eating inappropriate items such as holiday plants including mistletoe, holly and lilies and drinking Christmas tree water.
Enteritis also referred to as diarrhea. 
Colitis or inflammation of the large bowl leading to diarrhea often flecked with blood and mucus. Stress is usually the culprit.
Pancreatitis or inflammation of the pet pancreas often due to eating fatty foods including gravy, nuts and egg nog. Be careful as repeated bouts of pancreatitis lead to Pet Diabetes.


Gastric Foreign Body which means foreign objects found in the stomach. Common culprits include holiday decorations, ribbons and bones.
Hemorrhagic Gastroenteritis refers to vomiting and diarrhea with blood which is often related to inappropriate eating and holiday stress.
Intestinal Foreign Body refers to foreign object found in the intestines such as tinsel and other types of holiday décor.
Methylaxanthine Toxicity is another name for chocolate toxicity which may occur when pets eat chocolate and or other caffeinated products.

As far as cost, intestinal foreign bodies led the way costing nearly $3000.00 dollars per pet. On the other hand, enteritis or diarrhea was the least expensive condition to treat costing an average of $100 dollars pet.

Pet gastritis or inflammation of the stomach which ranked number one on the list cost pet owners nearly $300 dollars to resolve.

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat, a published author and a practicing, holistic veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients.

Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and makes homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats

Bone up on your pet holiday safety precautions for Fido and Fluffy now to help ensure a safe and healthy holiday season for all. When it comes to your pet’s health, an ounce of prevention far outweighs a pound of cure.

Getting Ready for Easter

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Easter is a favorite holiday for kids and adults alike. Family and church gatherings are often filled with delicious foods and candy treats, not to mention Easter egg hunts that are enjoyed by the young and old alike. While many pet owners are cautious regarding celebrations around Christmas, Valentine’s Day, and Independence Day, it seems that Easter foods and decorations are often overlooked in regards to pet health issues. Dr Carol would like to remind you about some Easter safety tips for your pets to ensure everyone enjoys the celebrations!

*  Cats typically tend to “smell the flowers” more then their canine counterparts, and it’s of little surprise that more cats are poisoned as a result of eating house plants and bouquet decorations. Lilies are a favorite around Easter in many homes, but these beautiful blossoms can cause kidney failure in cats.

* Careful with the candles! Decorative and fragrant candles can be beautiful and help to add a pleasing scent to the atmosphere. Parents of small children are often careful to place lit candles out of arm’s reach of a human child, but animal parents are sometimes forgetful that little Fido is as curious as any other youngster! Wagging tails and swiping paws can easily knock over a candle resulting in burns, messes, and worst of all, fires.

* Be especially attentive of pets in or around the kitchen and dining area during preparations and celebrations. Raw yeast dough can be especially dangerous for dogs and owners should remember that even a small amount can be harmful. Dogs also love the chocolates that are often shared at Easter. Chocolate bunnies can be deadly for your pup.

* Don’t share the Easter entree’ bones with your dog. Many pet owners will give their dog the bone from the ham, turkey, or lamb that is often prepared for Easter. Bones can splinter and cause intestinal problems for dogs and should be avoided.

All this week we will be sharing ways that you can enjoy Easter with your pet without compromising safety. Dr Carol will offer a nutritious snack or meal each day this week that you can consider preparing just for your pampered pooch so he or she can still be treated to a “special” meal at Easter.


Holistic veterinarian and pet health researcher,  Dr. Carol Osborne, DVM., is available for pet health questions and pet health consultations for dogs and/ or cats.
Contact Dr. Carol’s veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for your dog and/or cat today.

Why Chocolate is Never a Treat for Your Cat

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Face it, many cats love chocolate. And, because we humans love chocolate too, we have probably contributed to our pets’ taste for this treat. But for cats, this ‘treat’ can be deadly.  

Chocolate can be very dangerous to your cat.

Chocolate toxicity is one of the most common ‘poisonings’ we see in veterinary clinics, especially during the busy holiday season and Valentine’s Day. We know to keep that chocolate box meant especially for guests or that gift box of chocolates from our sweetheart out of Fluffy’s or Fido’s reach. But it is easy to overlook holiday baking with its more deadly chocolate forms – semisweet chocolate chips and baking chocolate.

Some cats tolerate chocolate better than others. Although the toxic dosage varies from animal to animal, everyone agrees that chocolate contains a lethal ingredient, a methylxanthine called theobromine, and that baking chocolate contains 10 times more of this lethal ingredient than milk chocolate.

Theobromine acts on four areas of your cat’s body:

  • It increases the rate and force of contractions of the heart.
  • It acts as a diuretic, causing your pet to lose body fluids.
  • It affects the gastrointestinal system, causing vomiting and diarrhea and it may cause stomach ulcers.
  • It acts on the nervous system, causing convulsions, seizures and sometimes, death.

If you find that your cat has ingested some chocolate, call your veterinarian or emergency clinic immediately. They will probably ask you the size of your cat, the type and quantity of chocolate your cat has eaten, and how long ago it was eaten. Try to have these answers before you call. They then may tell you to make your cat vomit. This will depend on the amount of chocolate ingested and how long ago it was eaten. If your veterinarian or emergency clinic determine that your cat needs to come into the hospital, do not delay. The effects of chocolate toxicity may not be apparent right away, but do not let that lull you into a false sense of security.

Holistic veterinarian and pet health researcher,  Dr. Carol Osborne, DVM., is available for pet health questions and pet health consultations for dogs and/ or cats.

Contact Dr. Carol’s veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for your dog and/or cat today.

 

Pet New Year Adventures to Explore for 2011

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Fun, safe, and exciting holiday adventures to enjoy and explore for pets and their people.

This New Year, almost 50% of America’s pet lovers plan to celebrate the festivities along with their 4-legged furry friends. In fact, traveling with pets has become the latest rage.

Not only have nearly 40,000 pet-friendly venues opened their doors to pet travelers, they are competing for your business and are ready, willing and able to pamper your pooch and cater to your every wim.

The ever growing pack of pet-friendly properties includes hotels ranging from the Hilton and Ritz Carlton to the Starwood and the Hotel W Chain.

Pet Perks for 2011 include amenities from designer dog beds made to match their human signature counterparts, plush puppy ropes along with leashes, collars and even personal puppy pagers. Pet massage therapists are on call and ready to roll when Fido needs a good massage.

Gourmut treats, made to order are prepared and placed on your pet’s pillow at turndown time.

For the casual pet traveler, offers include camp grounds, off leash parks, ski resorts, like Telluride and pet friendly beaches in Key West and Santa Belle.

Now, for those of you flying the friendly skies, it’s finally time for pet lovers to rejoice. You don’t have to worry about putting your pet in cold cargo holds anymore; dogs and cats now fly first class on Pet Airways. It’s the first pets only, no humans allowed airline.

Pets embark on a gorgeous, Beech craft 1900. The pet jet accommodates 19 “pawsengers and offer nonstop service between nine major U.S. cities. Believe it or not, the demand is so high, this pet jet has already increased their flight schedule by over 30% since their initial launch, last July.

Pets are hand-walked up the paw-printed ramp into the jet’s cabin which is fully lit, climate controlled and pressurized. Even better is the fact that pet owners no longer have to worry about a “carrier” because each cabin becomes fully stocked with custom carriers available to fit pets of all shapes and sizes.

A personal attendant checks your “furry friend” at fifteen minutes intervals throughout the flight and should any medications be needed, that’s included in the package.

A variety of pet rescue organizations as well as the ASPCA and the North Coast Animal League have gotten together and have already rescued and placed hundreds of dogs and cats picked up from situations in which they were abandoned, neglected and/or abused.

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Pet Trick or Treat Tips

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Halloween pet lovers preparing to enjoy this year’s tricks and treets? Here are a few of

Bone up on your Pet Halloween IQ and ensure fun for all while parading door to door this howl-a-day weekend.

Bowls of candy are best left for trick-or-treaters, as opposed to Fido and Fluffy. Chocolate in all forms is risky and potentially toxic for dogs and cats. Tin foil and cellophane candy wrappers can also be pet hazards if swallowed.

If you suspect your pet has ingested a potentially dangerous substance, please call your veterinarian or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center toll free at 1-888-426-4435.

Popular Halloween plants such as pumpkins and decorative corn are not toxic but pet stomach upsets, vomiting, diarrhea and even intestinal blockage can result if pets ingest enough.

Wires and electric cords should be taped securely to the floor or covered so your dog or cat doesn’t chew them and risk mouth burns or end up with electric pet shock.

Candles and potpourri oils, are best placed high up out of paw reach. Curious pets and kittens can easily knock them over and cause a fire or risk getting burned.

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Pet New Year Health Tips: Toxic Plants & Medications to Avoid

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Last year nearly 150,000 cases of pet poisoning and pet toxicities were reported for dogs and cats. To help ensure pets and their people enjoy a safe, healthy holiday this New Year here are a few safety tips to boost your pet health holiday IQ.

Plants and Medications to avoid with Dogs and Cats.

Holiday Plants are actually more of a problem with cats than with dogs, although curious puppies often enjoy a nibble.

Dr. Carol’s TIP: place plants up out of paw reach or consider safe alternatives like artificial arrangements made from silk.

Lilly’s are lovely but many varieties: Tiger, Asian, Japanese Show, Stargazer and Casa Blanca can cause kidney failure in cats

Poinsettia’s are often talked about, but are very overrated. At worst they can cause an upset stomach in dogs and cats.
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Pet Holiday Hazards & Safety Tips for Dogs & Cats

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xmas dogs dressed up
For most of us the holidays are a time to eat, drink and be merry with good friends and family. I wanted to offer my fellow pet lovers tips to refresh your pet festivity IQ and offers some helpful hints so the Yule tide traditions are as merry for you as they are for your pets.

personalized pet ID tags

Holiday Pet Basics: Be sure your pet is healthy, has his or her ID tags and collar, which can be personalized for your dog or cat, take a few precautions and use lots of common sense. Try to decorate your home according to the age, activity level and temperament of your pets and children. If your pets are young and active, homemade expendable ornaments are a great, safe and fun family project.

springer w tree

Holidays are hectic for all of us and that means stress for pets. To minimize stress try to keep your pets diet, snacks and routine as close to normal as possible. Be sure your pet has a quiet place to go so he can relax when he’s had enough. This helps avoid behavioral problems especially with children.

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Dr. Carol’s Top 10 List for Pet Broken Bones

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Although automobile accidents are the number one cause of broken bones in pets, surprisingly enough the second most common cause of fractures in pets is furniture in your home. Pets jump or fall from, for example, your couch or bed and break a bone.

A recent survey of pet fractures sums up the most common ways, from which broken bones in pets result. In 2008, hit by cars topped the list, followed by accidents in which pets fell or jumped, primarily from everyday household furniture.

xray-femoralfx-dog

Top 10 Ways Pets Break Bones

1. Hit by Car
2. Jumping
3. Falling
4. Fighting With Other Pets or Animals
5. Running and Slipping
6. Being Hit or Struck With an Object
7. Getting Caught in or Between an Object
8. Running into Object
9. Getting Stepped On
10. Being Injured in a Car Accident
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Dr. Carol’s Easter Time Safety Tips for Pets

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pup n bunny

For most of us the holidays are a time to eat, drink and enjoy good friends and family. Pet expert, veterinarian and author, Dr Carol Osborne, DVM helps pet owners refresh their pet health IQ and offers some helpful hints so the traditions are as joyous for you as they are for your pets.

Pet Holiday Safety Basics

Be sure your dog and cat are healthy, has his or her Identification tags and collar. Take a few safety precautions and use lots of every day common sense!

Try decorating your home according to the age, activity level and temperament of your pets and children. If they are young and active, consider homemade expendable ornaments. These are also a great, safe and fun family project.

Holidays are hectic for all of us and that means stress for pets! To minimize your pets stress try to keep your pets diet, snacks and routine as close to normal as possible. Be sure your pet has a quiet place to go so he or she can relax when he’s had enough. This helps avoid behavioral problems especially with children.

Herbal Stress Remedy: 5 Flower Remedy Flowers/Bach’s Rescue Remedy is wonderful, effective and very safe for dogs, cats and people. Place a few drops in your pet’s mouth, food or water bowl to relieve stress and anxiety.
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HOLIDAY PET PRECAUTIONS For DOGS & CATS

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The last thing any pet owner wants to do this holiday season is rush to the animal emergency clinic. Since the holidays often pose many unexpected pet health issues, veterinarian and author, Dr. Carol Osborne, DVM offers a few tips to help ensure your pets safety this season, so your holiday doesn’t end in disaster.

During the holidays, the majority of pet emergencies are due to pets eating something inappropriate. Certain foods cause upset stomachs, others are poisonous, and some can be life-threatening.

Since about 60% of pet lovers share holiday meals with their 4-footed family friends here are a few basic guidelines to keep in mind.

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