Veterinarian Featured at American Heart Association’s Cleveland Heart Walk Canine Corner

Ask Dr. Carol, Dogs, General Health, Pet News No Comments »

American Heart Association
The American Heart Association proudly announces the Canine Corner and Heart Health Walk!

Integrative Veterinarian Dr. Carol Osborne, DVM will be the featured speaker at this event.

Kids love dogs

Grab your leash and join us:

When:Saturday September 28, 2013

Where: Voinovich Park, 800 East 9th Street, Cleveland, Ohio 44114

What Time: 8Am to 12 Noon EST

Where: Voinovich Park, 800 East 9th Street, Cleveland, Ohio 44114

Admission: FREE for Dogs & their People

Enjoy this is FREE, fun filled healthy heart event dog owners can share with their canines.
People and their pets both benefit by updating their Pet Heart Health IQ!

Everyone has the opportunity to bone up on their Canines Heart Health, get lots of freebies, and stroll proudly with their pooch on the Canine Walk.

The Cleveland Heart Walk will be 1 mile long and for those people and pets fit and in top notch condition, there is a 3 mile option.

Freebies available include Pet Spa Gift Cards, Canine Clinics, Grooming and Boarding Gift Certificates, Dog Toys and Much more!

For more information contact the American Heart Association online at AmericanHeart.org, or by call their toll free phone at 1-800-282-0291

Dogs Chemically Neutered with a Shot

Ask Dr. Carol, Dogs, General Health, Pet News No Comments »

Traditionally, neutering a male dog required anesthesia and surgery, both of which come with a variety of risks.

But what if your dog could be neutered without surgery or anesthesia?
Dog Neuter Surgery

A new procedure referred to as “Chemical Dog Neutering” is now being offered by a handful of veterinary clinics. The dogs are neutered by receiving a injection given directly into each testicle.

Although the thought of this makes some people flinch, because a dog’s testicles have no nerves, the procedure is basically painless.

According to a study published in the American Journal of Veterinary Research, complications are rare and recovery time is short.

Restricting your dog’s activity 3-5 days after the injection is the current recommendation.

The manufacturer, Ark Sciences, reports that over the last 2 years, approximately 3000 dogs have already undergone the procedure. The injection which is sold under the name Zeuterin is actually a solution of zinc gluconate.  Zeuterin is FDA approved for puppies 3 to 10 months old.

The injection kills sperm and scars the dog’s testicles resulting in permanent canine sterility within 30 days.

Sedation is not required but is an option available many dog owners elect, to help avoid discomfort.

Dog Neuter Traditional Post Op

The testicles shrink in size and become a bit more firm after the injection, but still remain visible to the eye. Dog owners previously worried about their dog’s appearance post-op, no longer have to consider Neuticle’s or testicular implants for cosmetic purposes.

The production of Testosterone, which is the male sex hormone produced by the testicles is greatly reduced but not completely eliminated. The value of this is that canine behavioral issues, aggression and urine marking are eliminated but low levels of Testosterone still circulate through the bloodstream. Believe it or not this is excellent!

Why?…. because Testosterone is a vital hormone  that helps to protect and maintain many aspects of your dog’ s health and wellness, including his bones and joints as well as the heart, muscles and brain.

It is valid to understand that before a veterinarian can be approved to give this drug, he or she must undergo 5 hours of training. Complications after the injection are rare as previously stated, but improper injection technique as well as improper care post injection can lead to severe tissue damage as well as scrotal ulcers. Note that similar complications can occur after traditional canine neutering as well.

Dogs that have been neutered with this injection wear a special tag on their collar and in addition are tattooed in their groin area with a green Z.

Representatives from the manufacturer, Ark Sciences, expect the drug which was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in August of 2012, to become widely available to low-cost spay and neuter clinics and private veterinary practice clinics by the end of this year or very early in 2014.

At this time there is not a similar product available for female dogs. Oral contraceptives are being tested but none yet have been 100% effective.

Veterinarian Dr. Carol Osborne, DVM & "Tucker"

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Health Diplomat, a published author and a practicing, integrative veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients. Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and creates homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats.

Patented Pet Product Restores Old Dog’s Health

Dogs, General Health, PAAWS Success Stories No Comments »

Dear Fellow Pet Lovers, I wanted to share a nice note I received from a client who’s dog named Brutus is doing quite well.

Hello Dr. Carol,

I am pleased to report the 11.5 year old male miniature dachshund I ordered the Paaws Vitamins for, Brutus, is doing quite well.  I can definitely see an increase in his energy, in fact now he even runs when we take him for routine walks.

Brutus

I will continue to monitor his eyes, as they slightly less green in color, but clearer than before I started administrating your paaws vitamins.

He is still rather stocky at 12 pounds, but now that he up and moving, I think he will slim down again.

Otherwise he looks almost as good as he did when he was a puppy!

Thank you for making such a great product!!

Paul Greenberg, Boston MA.

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat, a published author and a practicing, holistic veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients.

Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and makes homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats

The Anti-Aging “A” Natural Pet Supplement List for Your Dog & Cat

Ask Dr. Carol, Cats, Dogs, General Health, General Health, Pet Nutrition No Comments »

 

Vitamin A: The water soluble form which is called Vitamin A Palmitate is a vital antioxidant for your pet that enhances immunity, and is essential for your dog and cat to utilize protein in his or her diet.  Beware of supplements containing Retinyl Palmitate.

Retinyl Palmitate is the fat soluble form of Vitamin A. It accumulates in the body and can become toxic because unlike water soluble vitamins it is not eliminated daily in the urine. In addition cats are not able to convert Retinyl Palmitate to the active, usable form of Vitamin A.
Vitamin C: Ascorbic Acid is the form of Vitamin C that acts as an antioxidant. Vitamin C is needed for tissue growth and repair. It also enhances pet immunity and is needed for your pet’s body to utilize Vitamin E.
Vitamin E: Vitamin E is one of the four fat soluble vitamins along with Vitamin A, D, and K. Vitamin E acts as an antioxidant. It also prevents heart disease, promotes wound healing, needed for your dog and cat’s body to utilize Vitamin C.
B-Complex Vitamins: As a group, B vitamins help your dog to maintain healthy nerves, skin and muscle. B-Vitamins are needed to provide energy to the body. Beware of supplements containing Brewer’s Yeast!

Brewer’s Yeast is a leading cause of allergies and itching in dogs and cats and is commonly used to provide low cost, inferior quality B Vitamins.
Coenzyme Q-10: A powerful, antioxidant which is found in the highest quantities in your pet’s heart. CoQ10 is essential for your pet’s immune function and is not only, beneficial for heart function but in Europe is used to treat heart disease.
Alpha Lipoic Acid: This antioxidant is both water and fat soluble and helps your dog to restore energy metabolism.
Selenium: Selenium is an essential mineral that works with Vitamin E to help your pet combat infection, by boosting internal Immunity. Selenium also acts an antioxidant and is beneficial to your pet’s skin and hair coat. Deficiencies of Selenium have been linked to cancer and heart disease.

Zinc: Zinc is an essential mineral pet’s need for protein synthesis. Zinc promotes healthy immune systems; an aid wound healing and is critical for hundreds of biological processes in your dog and cat’s body.
Omega-3 Fatty Acids: Omega-3 fatty Acids are essential components of cell membranes in your pet and are vital to healthy heart and brain function along with maintenance of dog and cat skin and hair coats.
Bioflavonoids: Bioflavonoids enhances the absorption of Vitamin C, have antioxidant effects, promote normal blood circulation and combat allergies for your dog and cat.
Glucosamine and Methyl-Sulfonyl-Methane (MSM): Both of these naturally occurring nutrients promote strong healthy bones, joints and cartilage for your dog and cat.
Digestive Enzymes: Digestive Enzymes are essential to life. There are five essential digestive enzymes pets require: Amylase to digest carbohydrates, protease to digest protein, lipase to digest fat, Cellulase to digest cellulose or plant fiber and lactose to digest lactase which is milk protein. Digestive Enzymes are manufactured in your pet’s pancreas and are vital to digest dietary nutrients for dogs and cats.
Melatonin: Melatonin is a naturally occurring amino acid found in highest concentration in your pet’s brain. Melatonin is the chief nutrient responsible for maintaining the health and wellness of the brain. It also combats Alzheimer’s and senility. In addition, it acts as an immune modulator and an antioxidant, triggering restful sleep for your dog and cat.
Ginseng: Ginseng has been used in Europe for centuries as a natural energizing herbal tonic which also promotes brain health and overall wellness for your dog and cat.
L-Glutamine: This is the primary amino acid needed for your dog and cat to energize the cells of their digestive system so dietary nutrients can be properly absorbed from the intestines and utilized after they have been digested in the stomach.
Colostrum: The first milk your puppy and kitten receive from their mother. Colostrum provides your dog and cat with their initial antibodies to protect him or her against disease and aid in immune system function.
Exercise: 20 minutes twice a day minimum for your dog. Ten minutes of playtime 4 times a day works well for cats.
Balanced, natural diet: Feed your dog and cat at least two meals daily. Fresh organic and natural nutrient sources are best.
Relaxation: Stress and anxiety affect pets and people adversely and elevated the aging hormone called Cortisol. Set aside an hour a day to relax and enjoy your dog and cat. Consider massage, yoga and music.
Positive mental attitude: The mind-body connection is a potent promoter of well-being for you as well as your dog and cat.
Pure water: Fresh, non-chlorinated preferably distilled water is essential for people and best for your dog and cat. Fresh water should be available at all times 24/7.

 

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat, a published author and a practicing, holistic veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients.

Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and makes homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats

How to Trim Your Dogs Nails

Ask Dr. Carol, Dogs, General Health No Comments »

Pet pedicures for your canine are important because overgrown nails can cause painful infections. Some dogs are active enough to wear their toenails down, but if you can hear a clicking noise when your dog walks across a hard floor, his nails are probably too long. For most dogs, nail trims once a month are best. Many dogs do not like having their feet handled, but if you start trimming your dog’s nails while he is still a puppy he will learn to tolerate nail trims.

A dew claw is a ‘fifth’ toe located in the thumb position, which may or may not be present. If your dog has dew claws then they need trimming too. When dewclaws overgrow they curl inward and can grow into the skin causing painful infections. They are also easily snagged and torn.

TIP: Dog Nail trims are important. Start with young puppies so they learn to accept them.

What You And Your Vet Can Do

Don’t use regular scissors to cut nails, they are not strong enough and can cause the nail to split. Use a clipper designed specifically for dog nails which can also be used for dewclaws.

Two different styles, primarily Guillotine and Roscoe, are available commercially and both work well as long as the blades are sharp. A metal nail file helps smooth edges down after the trim.

A blood vessel runs down the center of each nail that will bleed if the nail is cut too short. The vessel is easiest to see on the white nails so start with a white nail and use it as a reference for the dark nails. Just trim the tip that curves downwards so the nail remains parallel to the toe.


In case you trim a nail too short, have a styptic pencil (as sold for shaving cuts) or silver nitrate stick on hand to stop the bleeding. Flour, cornstarch or baking soda along with pressure will also work.

Each dog nail also contains a nerve called the quick. If you hit the nerve it is extremely painful. Professional groomers often use electric nail grinders. They let the quick recede which results in a shorter nail and a tighter paw.

Check the footpads and trim excess hair between the toes. A pair of scissors will work for this.

It is best to have dewclaws removed when puppies are just a few days old. They can also be removed later along with some other surgical procedure such as neutering or spaying.
Your vet or a professional groomer is best qualified to trim nails in nervous dogs or in those extremely apprehensive about having their feet handled.

NAIL TIP: Check your dog’s nails as part of his regular grooming routine. Problems can develop at the base of the nail that are easy to miss.

They tend to become infected and are uncomfortable.

Epsom salt soaks can provide symptomatic relief but in most cases, your vet will need to intervene.

Nail bed infections often require long-term antibiotic and/or anti-fungal therapy.

TIP: Guillotine clippers are very strong and are best suited for nail trims on large and giant breeds.

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat, a published author and a practicing, holistic veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients.

Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and makes homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats

Pet Antioxidants: Benefits for Dogs & Cats

Ask Dr. Carol, Cats, Dogs, General Health, General Health No Comments »

Your pet’s body naturally contains many antioxidants that work together, in a variety of ways to help protect and insure your pet’s health. Vitamins, minerals and certain nutrients are classified as antioxidants. Examples of antioxidants of importance for your pet’s health include: Vitamin A, Vitamin C and Vitamin E, the minerals: Selenium and Zinc, Calcium and Magnesium along with the natural nutrients Alpha Lipoic Acid, Lutein and Coenzyme Q10.

Antioxidants neutralize harmful compounds in pets called free radicals. Pet free radicals are formed each time your dog or cat takes a breath. Exposure to the sun’s ultraviolet rays, environmental toxins, pollution, heavy metals, stress, diet and drugs, including antibiotics, also contribute to their production. Billions of free radicals are formed in your dog’s and cat’s body each day.

Free radicals cause oxidative stress, which damages your pet’s body; in much the same way that oxygen causes iron to rust. Free radicals damage your dogs and cats cells and can also adversely effect vital tissues, organs and even DNA, their genetic material. These harmful changes accumulate and have been proven to decrease the quality and length of pet life.

Pet antioxidant supplements can increase your pets healthy life span and slow the aging process by providing the body with additional defenses against free radicals and decreasing the resultant levels of oxidative damage. Oxidative damage has been associated with many of the leading age related degenerative pet diseases including cancer, heart disease, liver and kidney disorders as well as arthritis and diabetes.

It is noteworthy to mention that phosphorus, iron and copper increase the rate at which dogs and cats age. Research documents the fact that by accelerating the pet aging process in dogs and cats, these elements actually decrease your pets healthy lifespan and reduce the length of their lives as a result. In addition, phosphorus accelerates kidney disease.

Pet vitamin supplements such as PAAWS Pet Vitamins and VitaLife Pet Supplements contain optimal levels of water soluble, natural anti-oxidants that are custom blended and patented specifically for dogs and cats. The PAAWS and VitaLife Advanced AM/PM Health and Wellness Complex are designed and dosed for pets based on their age and body weight.

Clinical Trials results from ongoing the 14 year Clinical Trials Life Time Study show that dogs and cats on Paaws Pet Vitamins are enjoying up to a 30% increase in healthy pet lifespans, which translates into 3-4 extra healthy years pets and their owners can both enjoy together. That’s something to bark about!

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat and a practicing, holistic veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients. Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and makes homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats

How to Detect & Treat Overweight Dogs

Ask Dr. Carol, Dogs, General Health No Comments »

Over half of America’s dogs are clinically obese, which by definition means they are 15 percent or more above their ideal weight. Being 10 percent overweight decreases a dog’s life span by one third and predisposes them to heart, liver, and kidney disease as well as arthritis and cancer.

More female dogs are affected than males. Hormones, genetics and individual variations in canine metabolism and appetite are predisposing factors.

But, the most common cause of dog obesity by far is pet owners who over indulge their dogs with treats, table scraps and oversized portions.

CAUSES of OVERWEIGHT DOGS

Overeating excess amounts of food is the number one cause.
Lack of exercise.
Neutering can promote weight gain.
Hormonal disorders especially low levels of thyroid hormone.

Dr. Carol’s TIP: Don’t sit on a sofa one day and decide to take a 10-mile hike the next. Increase your dog’s level of activity gradually a little bit each day.

IS YOUR DOG OVERWEIGHT?

To determine whether or not your dog is overweight, give him a rib check. You should be able to easily feel but not see each rib. Dogs should have a waist, which is the tucked up area behind the ribs. If your dog has lost his waist and/or if you can pinch more than an inch, it’s time to cut back.

Preventing excess weight gain initially is much easier than trying to lose weight. Weigh and record your dog’s weight each time you visit your vet.

Before beginning any canine weight-loss program, confirm your suspicions with your vet and rule out medical problems that mimic obesity including heart and liver disease, Thyroid disorders, Diabetes, and Cushing’s disease.

TIP: Regular weight checks help monitor your dog’s body weight.

WHAT YOU CAN DO

You should feed your dog a diet consisting of lean protein and high-fiber (over 15 percent), with low fat; less than 10 percent. Increasing the fiber provides bulk which fills him up and keeps your dog happy but spares calories at the same time.

You need to decrease your dog’s total number of calories by 20 percent to lose weight. Set a maximum initial weight loss at 15 percent and calculate your feedings and exercise to achieve this goal.

Increase the number of meals up to six per day ‘ the more meals you eat, the more your metabolism is stimulated which requires energy and burns calories. Don’t free-feed. Leave meals out for 10-15 minutes, and then pick them up.

Throw table scraps into the garbage and keep snacks to less than 5 percent of the total daily diet. Feed healthy dog snacks like white asparagus tips, cantaloupe slices, carrots and fresh vegetables.

Monitor your dog’s weight weekly: post a chart on the refrigerator door. It’s also fun to take ‘before’ and ‘after’ photos. When your dog reaches his target weight, change from the reducing diet to a weight maintenance diet. Monitor weight changes carefully for the first 60 days. Record his weight once a month for the first six months, then four times a year.

Aim for a minimum of 40 minutes of exercise each day. Two 20-minute walks is a good start and you can gradually build up from there. Local canine sport clubs are fun for the whole family and offer activities for all breeds.

Agility, fly ball and terrier trials are popular and lure coursing is a favorite for site hounds. Some fitness centers and health spas now offer packages to get you and your dog both into tip top shape.

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat and a practicing, holistic veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients. Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and makes homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats

Senior Dog Health Care and Canine Golden Years

Ask Dr. Carol, Dogs, General Health No Comments »

Of the 62.4 million dogs in the United States, 18 million are age seven and older; therefore they qualify as ‘Seniors’. This represents almost one-third of our canine population. In fact, over 75% of our dogs and cats have passed middle age and are entering their ‘golden years’.

To call a dog old, one must not consider chronological age, but rather physiological condition. Biological and chronological aging are not inexorably linked.

Aging begins when your dog’s body’s systems start to slow down ‘ when cells deteriorate faster than the body can repair them. We think of it as a progressive decline in mental and physical functioning and appearance which is accompanied by an increase in susceptibility to chronic canine diseases. This is caused primarily by three factors: Genetic inheritance, declining hormone levels and oxidative stress.

Though the aging process is different for every animal, it generally begins at maturity, somewhere between one and three years of age, depending on breed.

As with humans, actual canine chronological age, in other words, the year in which the dog was born, is often less important than biological age, which is determined by how a pet eats, moves and feels. Age related changes in body composition, organ function, mental alertness and endurance vary with each individual.

Advances in veterinary science over the past ten years have made it possible to retard and reverse many of the common phenomena which collectively comprise aging. Reducing oxidative stress along with proper nutrition are paramount to proper health.

DOG AGE AND SIZE

Six-month old puppies are similar to ten-year old children. A two-year old dog and 24-year old human are comparable.

After two years, one dog year is equivalent to approximately four human years, so a ten-year old dog is really about 56 human years. In general, large and giant breeds tend to age faster than smaller breeds.

DOG OXIDATIVE STRESS

The natural metabolic processes of our bodies as well as the toxins in our environment subject us to the damaging effects of harmful compounds called free radicals, which increase as your dog ages. These highly toxic molecules damage your dog’s DNA (genetic material) and proteins, and make them more susceptible to cancer, corrode their arteries and increase their risk of heart disease. In effect, they cause your dog’s body to ‘rust’ just like oxygen does to iron.

Pet Antioxidants are the body’s natural defense against free radicals. In addition to fending off free radicals, they also help protect cell membranes and DNA. Antioxidants, include Vitamins A, C and E; minerals like Zinc and Selenium; and other natural nutrients such as alpha Lipoic Acid and Co-Enzyme Q10. They decrease the level of oxidative stress and can be prescribed in specific formulas for pets as needed.

Essential fatty acids including Omega-3, Omega-6 and Omega-9, help dogs maintain a proper fatty balance as the body’s fatty acid synthesis naturally decreases with age. These compounds found in natural vegetable and fish oils promote a healthy skin and hair coat, maintain a healthy heart and keep mental function intact.  They also help to ‘prepare’ some dogs to better tolerate skin sensitivities.

There is still alot to learn about canine longevity but for now, we realize that every animal ages at a different rate and in different ways. Monitor your dog and especially watch for changes at about 5 to 7 years of age and if necessary make changes accordingly.

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat and a practicing, holistic veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients. Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats

Dog Dementia and Canine Cognitive Dysfunction

Ask Dr. Carol, Behavioral Problems, Dogs, General Health No Comments »

A lapse in dog house training behavior can occur later in a dog’s life. Canine Cognitive Dysfunction Syndrome (CDS) is the equivalent of Alzheimer’s disease in humans. It is the third leading cause of euthanasia, and affects over seven million dogs ten years of age and older.

CDS is an age-related deterioration of cognitive or mental abilities in dogs characterized by behavioral changes that include loss of house training, disorientation, aimless wandering, staring into space, and decreased responsiveness to family members, confusion and excessive sleeping.

There is no blood test or CAT-scan to test for canine cognitive dysfunction; the evidence can only be found by examining the dog’s brain post mortem.

Vets make the diagnosis by ruling out other problems that cause similar dog symptoms.

Traditional Canine Cognitive Dysfunction Syndrome Treatment

Anipryl is a once-a-day pill that helps to relieve dog dementia. Over 77 percent of dogs show improvement in less than 30 days with Anipryl.

Complementary Canine Cognitive Dysfunction Syndrome Treatments

Paaws Pet Vitamins and VitaLife Dog Supplements help many senior dogs to combat CDS by boosting brain function and restoring normal canine mental clarity and function.

Deprinyl is a natural nutrient available over-the-counter and is exactly the same as the medication currently sold as Anipryl but comes with a much lower price tag.

 

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat and a practicing, holistic veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients. Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats

Ask Dr Carol: Is it Kennel Cough?

Ask Dr. Carol, Dogs, General Health No Comments »

A reader recently wrote in to Dr Carol to ask about her dog’s coughing and snorting. A short segment of the letter is found below.

My dog developed a cough a few weeks ago. The vet said everything appeared fine, and she recovered fairly quickly. Recently, the cough has returned and now she’s started “snorting” in what seems to be an effort to clear a blocked nasal passage or something. What do you suggest? Cough it be kennel cough? 

A hacking cough is a cardinal sign of kennel cough, though most pets are vaccinated against this disease. Direct contact with another infected animal can result in the development of kennel cough. (Though most commonly affecting dogs, kennel cough can spread to cats, and rarely to humans!)

Most cases of kennel cough will resolve without treatment within a few weeks. Until that time, it is still difficult for pet owners to see their four legged family members hacking away at odd times. A herbal cough remedy that may offer relief from coughing due to kennel cough is  slippery elm. One teaspoon ( 5 ml) of slippery elm can be given by mouth as needed basis to control coughing.

Should the cough not resolve on its own, pet owners should consult with their veterinarian a second time and ask for further testing to rule out more serious causes. Chest x-rays and blood tests will typically be performed to diagnose the cause of chronic coughing that is not related to kennel cough.

 

Dr Carol examines LassieDr Carol Osborne is the world’s only veterinarian who is certified in anti-aging medicine. She is uniquely qualified to answer any questions you may have on pet longevity as well as overall pet health. Dr Carol is available forconsultations and offers a wide variety of pet health products, including her patented PAAWS vitamin supplements and other pet health items at DrCarol.com.

 
Entries RSS Comments RSS Log in