VETSULIN ALERT: Dog Diabetes Drug Killed Thousands Yet Back on Pet Market

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Vetsulin was originally marketed by Merck Animal Health, in 2004, as the first federally approved insulin for diabetic dogs and cats. After Vetsulin killed thousands of helpless dogs, it was finally discontinued in 2011 and just recently has been re-approved by the FDA. Vetsulin is now available to US veterinarians and diabetic pet owners.

Golden Retriever

Vetsulin is an insulin zinc suspension, of porcine origin which means it is derived from pigs.

According to Merck, the amino acid structure in Vetsulin is identical to canine insulin which Merck representatives said minimizes the risk of potential adverse immune mediated disorders resulting from its use in dogs. Diabetes in cats, on the other hand is not thought to be an immune mediated disorder therefore the risk of developing auto-antibodies is negligent.

In 2009, the FDA issued alerts regarding a lack of stability in Vetsulin. Pet owners were advised to keep a close eye on their diabetic pets in case of an adverse reaction. Following this initial FDA Alert, thousands of diabetic dogs were rushed into emergency rooms all across the country, suffering from the consequences of this unstable Vetsulin.

Results included kidney failure, anemia, and blindness due to cataracts, neurological disorders and death.

There was also a multi million dollar Vetsulin Class Action Law Suit filed and settled out of court in which some of the financial burdens experienced by grieving pet owners were addressed.

Vetsulin

Since Vetsulin was officially taken off the market in 2011, diabetic dogs and cats have been doing quite well on human DNA derived insulin, available for example, at Wal-Mart for a fraction of the cost when compared to Vetsulin.

Adverse reactions experienced by diabetic dogs taking human insulin have yet to be documented or even reported, according to this veterinarian and author’s knowledge.

According to Merck, the number of diabetic pets is currently exploding and in dogs has tripled over the last 30 years.

Merck says the stability and sterility issues in Vetsulin issues have been fully addressed, and FDA approval has been obtained to reintroduce Vetsulin to the US pet market.

Vetsulin, referred to as Caninsulin in Canada and other countries outside of the United States, has been used to treat diabetic dogs and cats overseas for more than 20 years.

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat, a published author and a practicing, holistic veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients.

Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and makes homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats

 

Dog Diabetes Cured with Single Shot

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Researchers from Spain have been able to cure canine diabetes Type 1 with a single session of gene therapy. Five lucky beagles tested in the study showed no signs of diabetes and recovered their health status and body weight for over four years after therapy.

The therapy consists of one session of injections given in the skeletal muscle of the hind leg. The injections provide two gene therapy vectors. One vector helps to express the insulin gene and the other gene acts to regulate an enzyme called Glucokinase.

Glucokinase is an enzyme that regulated glucose or blood sugar uptake from the blood. When both genes act at the same time they function as a “glucose sensor, ”automatically regulating blood sugar uptake by the blood which results in lowering the excess sugar or glucose in the blood.

This study which was published in the Journal of Diabetes is the first of its kind to demonstrate a long term cure for diabetes in animals, other than mice, using gene therapy.

This research paves the way for diabetes to be cured in people as well as pets. Potentially this study may also offer insight into new therapies for Type 11 diabetes.

Gene therapy has proven to be both safe and efficacious. It is based on transferring two genes to the hind leg muscle of animals using a new generation of very safe vectors called adeno-associated vectors, abbreviated as AAV. The vectors are derived from non-pathogenic viruses. They are already being used in gene therapy and have been quite successful in treating a wide variety of diseases.

Dogs treated with a single session of gene therapy exhibited good glucose control at all times, both when fasting and when fed. The blood sugar regulation in these dogs proved to be superior to those documented using insulin injections and episodes of low blood sugar, referred to as hypoglycemia were eliminated, even after exercise.

Long-term optimal control of pet diabetes has never been previously accomplished with any other novel diabetes therapy. Results confirmed that this gene therapy injection maintained normal blood sugar levels for over four years in dog diabetics with no secondary complications at all. For example, secondary complications resulting from diabetes including cataracts, blindness and kidney disease did not occur.

The strategy reported in this study is being prepared for clinical translation. This will act as the basis for initiation of clinical trials in veterinary medicine for diabetic dogs and cats. Those results will then be used to supply critical information not only for veterinary patients but eventually for human diabetics as well.

Diabetes mellitus is the most common metabolic disorder in pets. Diabetic pets require insulin injections daily to survive. Despite giving daily insulin injections most diabetic pets still suffer from serious secondary complications ranging from kidney disease and blindness to having limbs amputated.

This novel gene therapy not only offers these diabetic pets relief from the disease but also the potential to enjoy a normal life without the need for daily insulin injections or the risk of future blindness.

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat, a published author and a practicing, holistic veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients.

Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and makes homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats

 

 

 

 

Why Feeding Beans Benefits Pet Diabetes

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A recent study found that supplementing your pet diabetics diet with a variety of legumes including beans, chickpeas and lentils not only helps to stabilize blood sugar and insulin levels, they also boost good cholesterol or “healthy fat”, normalize blood pressure and promote healthy heart function.

Whether your pet is a vegan or eats commercial dog food, adding a nice variety of beans to your pets diet is a healthy choice.

For pet diabetics, beans also have what’s called a low glycemic index. The glycemic index is a reference range foods are given that reflects their effect on blood sugar. Pet diabetics are best fed foods with a low glycemic index so the insulin requirement and therefore daily dosage remains stable and blood sugar fluctuations are avoided.

Cholesterol and blood pressure are affected adversely in many diabetic pets and once again because beans benefit both, chances are your vet bills will be lower and your pet will enjoy a better daily quality of life as well.

How much should pets be fed?

Basically consider making up to 1/3 of your pet’s diet beans. Legumes may be added to commercial diets as well as homemade. Beans also make great snacks assuming your pet enjoys them which you will only find out by trying it for yourself!

Researchers noted the fact that low glycemic diets have been controversial with respect to their benefits on health.

Scientists concluded that legumes are part of a healthy pet diabetic diet but whether the high content of soluble fiber in the bean or the beans themselves

are responsible for these benefits remains to be seen.

Certainly nutritional therapy for pet diabetes is effective.

Understanding that there is no single medication or insulin regime appropriate for all pets it makes sense that there is also no single nutritional intervention appropriate for all diabetic pets.

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat, a published author and a practicing, holistic veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients.

Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and makes homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats

 

Dog Diabetes: Pet Owner Grateful for Online Vet Advice

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I wanted to share this note I received from a pet owner whose 12 year old Yorkie named Xena was diagnosed with Canine Diabetes.

Hello Dr. Carol,

This picture below was taken before I started the low glycemic diet and the Dr. Carol Diabetes and Paaws Vitamin Regime.

Notice the total difference in Xena from her early days with diabetes.

Aside from the severe weight loss she suffered, the volume, quantity and density of her hair became sparse to say the least.

I objectively measure this by the fact that her haircoat became so thin it did not weigh down her ears in the customary floppy fashion we were used to seeing.

I also sent you pictures of what Xena’s haircoat looked like at the height of her health before her diabetes.

 

 

The Paaws vitamin regime, your digestive enzymes and probiotics along with the low glycemic home-made food diet you taught me to make for Xena, restored her health after being diagnosed with Diabetes.

Although she is blind now, her hair and skin are nearly restored to her pre-diabetic days. Notice how her floppy ears are weighed down by her hair now. That was not the case before your wonderful help and advice.

Her insulin dose dependency was also reduced to half after following Dr. Carol’s expert regime.

Thank you Dr. Carol. I will call you to replenish the Paaws vitamins and Xena’s other supplements after our vacation. May God Bless you and continue to bring you health and continued wisdom to help our canine friends!

Ana G. from NY; Xena 12 Year Old, Diabetic Yorkie

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat and a practicing holistic veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients. Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.
Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Monitoring Diabetic Dogs

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Proper regulation of a diabetic dog involves pet owners monitoring and calculating sugar and insulin dosages twice a day at home. Consider learning how to make a glucose curve for your diabetic dog. This is very helpful and will provide you and your vet with valuable information. You can monitor sugar level trends and follow your pet’s sugar levels accurately and cost effectively.

To Make Your Pets Personal Sugar Curve:

Take a piece of notebook paper and write down the date each day. Place the dates vertically down the left side of the paper. Across the top of the paper, mark down the time of day, urine sugar reading, and the dose of insulin you have given every morning and every evening.

You can also add a box at the end of each day to mark down any important signs you noticed in your pet that day such as appetite, energy levels, attitude, water consumption, frequency of urinating, etc. Whenever you visit your vet bring your chart along and review it with your vet. Once you make your pet’s sugar curve chart, be sure to post it in a convenient place like your refrigerator door. This way everyone in your family will be on the same page when it comes to your pets insulin dosages.

How to Determine Proper Insulin Dosage:

To determine the proper insulin dosage, simply match the color of your dog’s urine to the numeric value on the Diastix strip. This is vital to try to minimize further internal organ damage and preserve what, if any, vision is left before cataracts occur. It is important to remember that your goal each day with the urine Diastix is a reading of “trace.” Each time you get a reading of “trace”, that means you are doing a great job and you just repeat the previous insulin dosage! If the Diastix reads minus 1, reduce the insulin dose by 1 unit. If the Diastix reads minus 2, decrease the dose by 2 units. If the Diastix reads plus 2, increase the insulin dose 2 units, if the reading is plus one, increase the insulin dose one unit. It is important to remember that you NEVER, ever increase or decrease the insulin dosage by more than 2 units.

It is always a good idea, to keep a jar of honey or karo syrup handy just in case your diabetic dog looks dazed or seems “wobbly” after you’ve given insulin. These are signs that the insulin dose was too high and as a result your pet’s blood sugar is too low. We call this hypoglycemia. If this occurs, rub a teaspoon of the honey or karo syrup directly into your pets gums. It is immediately absorbed through the gums and enters the blood, raising the blood sugar level almost instantly. Returning the blood sugar back to a normal level makes your pet feel much better and avoids a hypoglycemic or low blood sugar crisis.

Example of a Daily Routine:

The daily home routine for most diabetic pets is as follows: You wake up, take your pet outside and collect the first morning urine. Use the Diastix and get a urine sugar reading so you know what dose of insulin to give. Feed your pet 1/3 of his breakfast, give the proper amount of insulin, and then give your pet the remainder of his or her breakfast. Repeat the same procedure in the evening.  If your pet does not eat the first part of his or her meal before it’s time for you to inject the insulin, this is a sign that something is wrong. If this happens, do not give any insulin, call your vet.

Dr. Carol’s Tip: Cut each urine test strip in half longitudinally, turning 50 Diastix into 100 and cutting your cost in half!  We have enjoyed success in many of our diabetic canine patients using the above formula along with home-made organic diets and a natural, patented canine vitamin-supplement.


Holistic veterinarian and pet health researcher,  Dr. Carol Osborne, DVM., is available for pet health questions and pet health consultations for dogs and/ or cats.
Contact Dr. Carol’s veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for your dog and/or cat today.

Cookie Treats for Diabetic Dogs

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Looking for a great low fat, low sugar dog treat?  Try making your dog carrot and hummus cookies, safety guaranteed by Dr Carol. Recipe: courtesy of Ana and her diabetic dog Xena.

Ingredients:
16 ounces Chick Peas (also called garbanzo beans),
1 pound beef liver steaks,
1 bag of organic carrots,
4 cups of distilled or filtered water,
1/3 cup of extra virgin olive oil,
Mandolin or Sharp Knife for slicing very thin carrot slices

STEP ONE: Place 4 cups of filtered water and the 16 ounces of chickpeas to soak for 24 hours in a large cup or bowl. Soaking allows the chick peas to absorb water which hydrates them so that they become soft, which results in a delightful creamy hummus.

STEP TWO: Sear the 1 pound beef liver steaks with 1/3 cup of extra virgin olive oil in a sauté pan. Sear both sides until fully cooked.

STEP THREE: Drain the water from the 16 ounces of chickpeas that soaked overnight and discard the water.

STEP FOUR: Ideally using your food processor, pulse mix the chickpeas until they look creamy. There is no need to add additional water.

STEP FIVE: There you have it! The raw hydrated chickpeas have been transformed into HUMMUS! Pour the hummus into a zip lock bowl that has a tightly sealed lid.

Notice the creamy texture.

STEP SIX: Place the seared and cooked beef liver into the Cuisinart- Pulse until creamed liver pate’

This is Beef Liver Pate’

STEP SEVEN: Mix the liver pate’ and hummus in the same zip lock bowl.

STEP EIGHT: Slice your carrot slices as thin as possible.

STEP NINE: Arrange your carrot slices and dab the 50-50 mixture of creamed hummus and liver pate’ as the carrot cookie filling.

Xena is deciding which live hummus
cookie treat to eat!

Lip Smackin Good!!

Now.. if only we could come up with healthy cookies that we humans love to eat!

Holistic veterinarian and pet health researcher,  Dr. Carol Osborne, DVM., is available for pet health questions and pet health consultations for dogs and/ or cats.

Contact Dr. Carol’s veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for your dog and/or cat today.

 

Diabetic Dog Thrives on Healthy People Food Diet

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As a pet owner, do you wonder what you’re really feeding your dog? Was your canine a victim of the 2004 or 2007 Menu Pet Food Recall? Does your dog suffer from allergies? Did your dog get diagnosed with Cancer? Why did your vet recommend a “special” diet your dog doesn’t really like? Are you spending a fortune on your pet’s food?


Pet Food has become a true dilemma for many dog and cat owners! Ever think about home cooking for your pets but worried about making a mistake?

As a practicing holistic veterinarian for many years, many of my pet patients want to give their pets the very best, especially when it comes to pet food. The problem is how to figure out whats best for your pet.

This will be the first of my pet food series on Homemade Pet Diets:

Pawsitively Healthy Homemade Canine Cuisine…made with People Food

Poochys Pork Butts with Black Rice-n-Broccoli Florets

Step 1: Pour 1/4 cup of olive oil in a Dutch oven pot

Step 2: Sear two, three pound Organic Pork Butts, preferably the BONELESS CUT Ends, in a Dutch Oven and sear them on both sides until brown.
This also releases the porks natural flavors and juices.

Step 3: Add 4 Cups of distilled or filtered water to the seared pork.

Step 4: Place your Covered Dutch Oven containing the seared pork butts and water in your oven and cook (covered) at 350 degrees for 4 hours.

Step 5: After four hours the Pork will easily shred. Shred the pork and then add the 16 ounces of black rice. There will be flavored water and natural tasty juices left over in the Dutch oven that haven’t evaporated because the tight fitting lid retains the juices and flavor.


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Muggs, the Diabetic Dog Thrives at Age 20!

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Dear Dr. Carol,

We had the pleasure of coming into contact with you about 2 years ago when our dog Muggs, a yorkie was about to turn 17 years old.

He was suffering greatly from Diabetes and we had him on a “Standard” Veterinarian Protocol of “Vetsulin”, a product you were kind enough to inform us about and warn us that this Product had actually been recalled.

We informed our Vet who knew nothing about the recall and insisted the product was safe and effective.  Why then, we wondered, was Muggs trending worse and worse while using the Vetsulin, suffering lethargy, disorientation, uncontrollable urination and excessive demand for water no matter how much he drank?

We were sadly considering putting Muggs down as his quality of life was lessening each day. You advised us to switch him over to a human insulin product readily available (and incredibly less expensive) at Wal Mart, and how to check his urine using readily available Test Strips.

You also provided us with a foolproof method of tracking his progress.  We are happy to let you know that Muggs will be celebrating his 20th Birthday on March 12 of 2012.  He has no clue how old he is and we have no intention of letting him know!

He’s happy, active, healthy, and has more teeth than I do!  I’m anxiously looking forward to trying out your Eye Essentials as a supplement to maintaining his current level of good eyesight (he easily recognizes Friends at the other end of the Block during our walks).

Dr. Carol, it was fate that brought us to you, and now it our mission to let others know that you are here for all of us with truth and knowledge and your Pet Products geared toward improving the life of our canine companions.

Much love from your Friends in Los Angeles…Walter, Lud, and Muggs..

About Dr. Carol

Holistic veterinarian and pet health researcher,  Dr. Carol Osborne, DVM., is available for pet health questions and pet health consultations for dogs and/ or cats.

Contact Dr. Carol’s veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for your dog and/or cat today.

 

 

Pet Diabetes Alert: Vetsulin Law Suit

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Fellow Pet Lovers,

I wanted to share the latest update regarding Pet Diabetes and the Vetsulin Class Action Law Suit. The FDA has finally announced the fact that the Vetsulin Critical Need Program and Vetsulin is no longer available to treat pet diabetes in dogs or cats.

Veterinarians and diabetic pet owners must now transition their dogs and cats to another type of  insulin. For the vast majority of diabetic dogs and diabetic cats, DNA based insulin, available in a variety of formulations is available through veterinarians, at Walmart, as well as at most local pharmacies.

The law firm handling the Vetsulin Law Suit for affected Diabetic Pets asked me to share this letter:

The $29 Million Dollar Vetsulin Class Action Law Suit is being handled by the law firm Murry & Murray Co., L.P.A. Richard Kerger serves as legal counsel for diabetic pet owners affected by Vetsulin in an action pending in the Federal Court in Toledo, Ohio in which pet owners whose diabetic pets were injured by defective Vetsulin have sued the manufacturer, Intervet Schering-Plough and it’s parent company, Merck.

This has been filed as a $29 Million Dollar Vetsulin Class Action Law Suit, however discussions are currently underway which may lead to a resolution of this matter on an individual, rather than class basis.

The owners of diabetic pets adversly affected by Vetsulin may be able to recover part or all the expences they incurred.  Adverse Vetsulin effects diabetic pets may have suffered include blindness, cataracts, kidney and/or liver failure, and death. Diabetic pet owners must contact the law firm at Kergerlaw.com ASAP, before Vetsulin settlement discussions have ended.

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Dog Pancreatitis Cured Naturally & Avoids Diabetes

Ask Dr. Carol, Avoiding Disease, Diabetes, Dogs, PAAWS Success Stories, Pancreas-Problems, Pancreatitis, Pet News, Pet Nutrition, Zoonotic Diseases 1 Comment »

Dr. Carol – what can I say…you’re truly a blessing!!!

My 8 year old Lab,  Harley got very sick.  My dog wasn’t eating and I had to take a water bowl to her to get her to drink.  She had zero energy and her breathing was weird and she had urinated all over the kitchen floor one night.

I thought her breathing seemed a bit labored, in the end I would find out it was because my dog was in pain.

Anyway, I spent $1,200 at the emergency vet.  They weren’t finding anything. They called in a ‘specialist’ to look at her and he duplicated some of the lab tests as he wanted to have them sent to a different lab.

All the tests came back pointing to problems with my dog’s pancreas.  The next step would have been to do an expensive ultra sound to ‘try’ to figure out what to do next.

I contacted Dr. Carol as I knew her PAAWS products had helped my mom’s dog a few years back.  I sent her a copy of Harley’s lab results.  She looked them over and offered her advice free of charge.  She saved me the expense of the ultra sound.

She instructed me to feed Harley a home-made pet diet made of brown rice, boiled chicken, peas and sent me some of her pet products (Probiotics and Digest-Zymes) to sprinkle on her food.

I wasn’t sure if Harley would eat it because she tends to be a bit picky.  She not only ate Dr. Carol’s home-made diet, she was wanting MORE. I took a sigh of relief (that she was eating)!!  Harley has also started on the PAAWS product and she LOVES them!!!

Just before Harley got sick, I had recently opened a new bag of Iams Healthy Naturals (lamb meal and rice).

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