Cat Kidney Problems & Feline Kidney Disease

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Cat

Your cat’s kidneys filter and remove toxic waste products from the cat’s blood via the urine. They also regulate calcium and vitamin D levels, maintain the cat’s level of hydration and secrete the hormone responsible for red blood cell production.

Acute cat kidney disease occurs suddenly and is rare in cats but, with prompt recognition and treatment, it is generally reversible. Chronic feline kidney disease occurs as the kidneys deteriorate slowly over a cat’s lifetime. This is the most common situation and is called chronic renal (or kidney) disease (CRD). CRD is not reversible and signs generally don’t occur until 80 percent of kidney function is lost.

CAUSES OF CAT KIDNEY PROBLEMS

Cat Chronic Kidney Failure– A variety of chronic conditions causing exaggerated abnormal allergic type and/or immune reactions can result in Chronic Kidney Disease in cats.

  • Chronic Dental Disease
  • Chronic bacterial and viral infections
  • Chronic skin allergies
  • IBD and hormonal disorders like Diabetes
  • Blood pressure too high or too low
  • Dehydration
  • Trauma
  • Improper diet, excess phosphorus and protein

TIP: Long term excessive urination and excessive drinking are the most common initial signs of chronic kidney failure.

WHAT YOU AND YOUR VET CAN DO

Cat Get Sub Q Fluids

Diagnostics:

Routine lab tests (blood, urine) don’t reveal CRD until 75 to 80 percent of your cats kidney function is lost. X-rays and ultrasound allow visualization of the kidneys. A biopsy confirms the exact diagnosis. Local anesthesia and ultrasound are used to aid removal of a tiny piece of kidney tissue and/or cells which are examined under the microscope.

Fluid therapy to correct dehydration is the single most important factor in treatment. Without normal kidney function toxins, like Ammonia, normally eliminated in the urine build up in the blood and cause serious damage like vomiting, diarrhea, appetite loss, anemia, heart problems, and dementia. Fluids may be given under the skin or through a catheter (tube) inserted into a vein. Some owners learn to give fluids under the skin at home as seen in the photo on the left.

  • Dialysis machines that filter toxins from the blood and kidney transplants are available in extreme cases.
  • Special diets with restricted levels of protein and phosphorus reduce the toxic waste load on the kidneys.
  • Calcitrol is a form of activated Vitamin D, (a hormone) that helps prevent progression of kidney disease. It is given by mouth daily and is excellent.
  • Ambodipine (Norvasc R) safely reduces blood pressure when necessary to prevent Hypertension.
  • Tumil-K is a potassium source which is often low in these cats due to lack of appetite. Appetite stimulants may be needed.

COMPLEMENTARY CAT KIDNEY THERAPY

Vitamins

  • B Vitamins and Iron help combat Feline Anemia which is often present with CRD because the kidneys normally makes hormone that stimulates red blood cell production.
  • Vitamin B Complex – 5 milligrams daily
  • Vitamin C powder – 250 mg 3 times per day
  • Vitamin E – 400 Iu (international units) once a week
  • Vitamin A – 10,000 Iu (international units) once a week
  • Glandular – beef kidney – available at grocery stores – cats enjoy this
  • Paaws Cat Vitamins are comprehensive and very helpful for kidnet disorders

CAT KIDNEY HERBAL REMEDIES

  • Kombu broth – seaweed rich in minerals and low in sodium
  • Parsley tea – 1 Tsp herb taken internally is high in minerals, Vitamins A, B, C and Potassium.
  • Horsetail Grass infusion
  • Hornbeam is a Bach Flower Remedy used for cold, weak cats – 3 drops daily

About the Author:

Integrative Veterinarian Dr. Carol Osborne, DVM

Dr. Carol Osborne, DVM, is an Integrative Veterinarian currently practicing in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.  She is the founder and director of the Chagrin Falls Veterinary Center in Chagrin Falls, Ohio. Chagrin Falls Veterinary Center is the 1st Integrative Pet Wellness Center in N.E., Ohio.

In addition to offering traditional medical and surgical veterinary services for dogs and cats, Dr. Osborne complements that with a natural, holistic approach to your pets health. She also addresses your pets diet and nutrition and when possible offers natural remedies and vitamin-mineral-antioxidant supplements to compliment traditional medications and therapies.

This comprehensive approach to your pets health is individualized and specifically geared to optimize your pets wellness,  boost internal immunity, speed healing and restore natural homeostasis. To set up a visit for your dog and/or cat, begin by calling 440-247-5901.

Dr. Osborne also offers pet health consultations for her out of town clients. To schedule a consultation for your pet call toll free: 1-866-372-2765.

Bookmark http://blog.drcarol.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and more for your dogs and cats.

Pet Kidney Disease:Phosphorus Binders for Dogs & Cats

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Pet Products to remove Excess Phosphorus for Dogs & Cats with Kidney Disease


Aluminum hydroxide (ALOH) is currently recommended by Board Certified Veterinary Internists at the University of Davis, veterinary hospital as the product of choice to use in pets to effectively bind and eliminate excess phosphorus from the body. It has effectively replaced Epikacin for this purpose.

The Pet Kidney Dialysis Center at University of Davis in California is top notch, offering state of the art treatment, dialysis and kidney transplants for pets with advanced kidney failure.

Azodyl is an over the counter product made in France and distributed by a company called Vetoquinol for pets. Another company Kilbow Biotics, sells Azodyl for humans. Azodyl, contains three varieties of “good bacteria”, or what we refer to as probiotics, (also found in organic yogurt, such as “activia”)  specifically E. thermophilus (KB 19), L. acidophilus (KB 27), and B. longum (KB 31), along with some Psyllium husk.

The Vetoquinol web site suggests that using Azodyl, along with another product, called Epikacin they also manufacture helps to reduce nitrogenous waste and flush “uremic” toxins from the bodies of dogs and cats with kidney problems, therefore lowering BUN and Creatinine blood levels.

Epikacin, made by the same company, is a Calcium based product, labelled to bind excess phosphorus and help eliminate it from the body, in pets with kidney failure. Unfortunately, excess calcium blood levels are usually also present in pets with kidney failure and because of this, newer products specifically Aluminum Hydroxide is considered to be the best product available to reduce excess phosphorus and calcium blood levels.

Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest news, tips and pet anti-aging updates for your dogs and cats.

Holistic veterinarian and researcher, Dr. Carol Osborne, DVM is available for pet health care consultations and pet health questions.

Call Dr. Carol’s office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for your pet.

Pet Kidney Disease: Natural Remedies For Dogs & Cats

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Natural Pet Kidney Therapy for Dogs and Cats

Herbal Pet Kidney Remedies

Fish oil is a source of Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Rhubarb (Rheum Officinale)

B Vitamins and Iron

Balanced, comprehensive, natural pet vitamin mineral supplements including PAAWS Pet Vitamins and VitaLife Pet Supplements

Glandulars or dietary beef kidney

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) one tablet per 30 pounds of body weight given once daily may help strengthen kidney tissue.  Crush and mix with food.

Fresh parsley is a diuretic herb which promotes urination and may be useful in certain cases.

*Kidney Essentials is a natural herbal combination of superior plant based phytonutrients that help to maintain and restore normal kidney function in dogs.

Mastica soothes sensitive stomachs for pets with acute and chronic pet kidney disease.

Homeopathic Pet Remedies for Companion Animal Kidney Disease

Kali chloricum is recommended for long-term pet kidney disorders

Arsenicum album 30c counteracts vomiting in acute pet Kidney Disease

Silicea 30c helps to slow down degeneration of pet  kidney tissue in long-term cases.

Pet Products to Remove Excess Phosphorus for Dogs & Cats with Kidney Disease:

Aluminum hydroxide (ALOH) pictured below, is currently recommended by Board Certified Veterinary Internists at the University of Davis, veterinary hospital as the product of choice to use in pets to effectively bind and eliminate excess phosphorus from the body. It has effectively replaced Epikacin for this purpose.

The Kidney Dialysis Center at University of Davis in California is top notch, offering state of the art treatment, dialysis and kidney transplants for pets with advanced kidney failure.

Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest news, tips and pet anti-aging longevity updates for your dogs and cats.

Holistic veterinarian and researcher, Dr. Carol Osborne, DVM is available for pet health care consultations and pet health questions.

Call Dr. Carol’s office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for your pet.

Aluminum and Pet Kidney Failure in Dogs & Cats

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Dr. Larry Nagode (DVM, Ph.D.) professor at  The Ohio State University Veterinary College recommends treating pets in chronic kidney failure with phosphorus values over 6 with aluminum hydroxide binders, rather than using calcium based binders like Epikacin.  Dosage is based on your pet’s body weight.

Generic Aluminum Hydroxide Dry Gel Powder (USP) may be purchased from local compounding or hospital pharmacies or by mail order.  This is the most convenient phosphorus binder because it is tasteless and easy to mix with wet pet food and may also be mixed with dry pet food.

To mix aluminum hydroxide with dry pet food simply place the aluminum hydroxide binder and dry pet food in a plastic baggie and the dry pet food will absorb the aluminum hydroxide binder overnight.

Alternatively pet owners can slightly warm the dry pet food in the microwave for 5-8 seconds. Then shake the aluminum hydroxide powder with the pet food in a baggie like a “shake and bake”. The outer fatty coating of dry pet food which is called digest, softens with warming and that allows the aluminum hydroxide powder to attach more readily to the pet food.

The dry gel powder is non-prescriptive but some pet compounding pharmacies and other vendors may insist upon a veterinary prescription.

For a dog or cat in chronic kidney failure that will need to be on phosphorus binders for a lifetime, aluminum hydroxide is most effective and least expensive option.

Three brands of aluminum hydroxide dry gel powder are readily available: PCAA, Spectrum and Gallipot.

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Pet Kidney Failure: Phosphorus Binders

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Pet Kidney Disease affects thousands of dogs and cats each year. Because many pet medications offered for dogs and cats suffering with kidney failure can be confusing, and since online information often offers conflicting recommendations, here are some tips to help pet owners address their dog and cat’s kidney health.

One of the problems that is very common in pets with chronic kidney failure other than elevated BUN and Creatinine levels is Phosphorus and Calcium. This discussion will address binders available to reduce or lower elevated blood Phosphorus levels in dogs and cats with kidney disease.

Calcium-based Pet Phosphorus Binders such as Phos-Lo and Tums are readily available and inexpensive.

But they’re not as effective as the pet Aluminum Hydroxide (ALOH) binders, because they require large doses and they are not as safe.  There is also the risk that supplementing Calcium in a dog or cat with Chronic Kidney Failure can lead to serious problems such as excessively elevated blood Calcium levels, called Hypercalcemia.

Hypercalcemia or high calcium in your pets blood, can lead to calcium deposits which are referred to by vets as “soft tissue calcification.” Calcium based stones like the one in the photograph below, can form in various areas of your pets body, including the urinary bladder, kidneys and heart.

Elevated Calcium can also cause pet kidney failure and pet cancer including kidney cancer and lymphoma cancer in dogs and cats.

Epikacin is an example of a calcium based phosphate binder, often prescribed for dogs and cats in kidney failure.

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The ABC’s of Pet Kidney Health

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Your pets kidneys serve many vital pet functions.  They filter and remove toxic wastes from the body via the urine, regulate Calcium and Vitamin D levels, maintain fluid levels, and secrete the hormone responsible for red blood cell production.

Anything that interferes with the kidneys’ ability to function properly can cause pet kidney disease, which is the second only to cancer as a leading cause of death in pets.  In most cases, progressive age-related deterioration is responsible, with no apparent cause.

Other causes of pet kidney disease in dogs and cats include bacterial and viral infections, nutritional factors, immune system defects, toxins such as excess Vitamin D currently in Blue Buffalo recalled dog food and Antifreeze, as well as inherited pet breed disorders.

“Acute” pet kidney disease occurs suddenly, is much less common than chronic kidney disease in pets, and with prompt treatment is generally reversible.

Long-term “chronic” kidney disease referred to as chronic pet renal disease is the most common form in dogs and cats.  It is usually the result of slow age-related deterioration of the kidneys.

Signs of Pet Kidney Disease

Initially dogs and cats drink water and urinate excessively.  The urine produced is dilute so dogs and cats become dehydrated and drink a lot to try to replace the lost fluids.

No matter how much pets drink; they are unable to maintain normal hydration.

Advanced signs of Pet Kidney Disease include weight loss, vomiting, depression and loss of appetite.  Signs are not apparent until 80 percent of your pets kidney function is already lost.

Routine diagnostics for pet kidney disease include blood and urine tests as well as abdominal x-rays.

A kidney biopsy is generally necessary to confirm the exact cause.  In most cases, a biopsy is not obtained and treatment is symptomatic.

Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest news, tips and pet anti-aging longevity updates for your dogs and cats.

Holistic veterinarian and researcher, Dr. Carol Osborne, DVM is available for pet health care consultations and pet health questions.

Call Dr. Carol’s office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for your pet.

Natural Pet Kidney Therapy for Dogs & Cats

Ask Dr. Carol, Cats, Dogs, Kidney Disease, Kidneys 1 Comment »

What Pet Owners and Vets Can do for Kidney Disease in Dogs and Cats

Fluid therapy is the single most important factor in the treatment of pet kidney disease. Your pet’s kidneys normally function to maintain fluid levels by concentrating the urine.  With pet kidney disease, excess fluids are lost into the urine so dehydration becomes a major problem. Severe fluid losses can lead to shock and ultimately death.

Good pet nutrition is also critical!

The goal is to decrease the workload on your pet’s kidneys by decreasing the amount of waste the kidneys must eliminate.  Excess dietary protein, phosphorus, calcium and salt create a lot of waste. Pet diets should therefore contain small amounts of high-quality proteins, low salt (use salt substitute), and minimal phosphorus. Home-made pet kidney diets are ideal and can be tailored specifically for your dog and/or cat.

The most important parameter with respect to pet dietary protein is quality rather than an absolute amount. For example human dialysis patients eat eggs. Why? … Each egg contains 7 grams of pure protein on which the kidneys do not work at all to utilize.

Home-made pet kidney diets can be easily tailored to meet your pets specific needs. Balancing home-made pet kidney meals by adding a comprehensive, natural pet vitamin supplement.

Adding natural, herbal kidney nutrients has also proven beneficial to many pet patients with kidney disease in this veterinarians clinical experience.

Trying to determine protein pet food levels, by reading pet labels can be quite misleading. For example, a chemical called Cyanuric Acid, used as a pool cleaner is approved as a pet food additive to artificially elevate pet food protein levels.

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