Save a Life: Learn How to Detect Your Dogs Vital Signs

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Being able to accurately detect and determined your dog’s vital signs can make the difference between life and death!

Dog Vitals

Your dog’s heart health is not only vital to your pet’s life, but it also directly affects your dog’s life span, daily quality of life and overall longevity.

Boost your Dog’s Heart Health IQ by learning how to detect your dogs vital signs… it might just save your best friends life!

To begin, familiarize your-self with your dog’s normal vital statistics so that once you are familiar with what is normal, you will be able to detect and identify abnormalities that much more quickly and address them with your veterinarian.

Normal Dog Heart Rate in beats per minute (bpm): your dog’s average heart rate is based on the size and/or age of your canine.
Puppies, up to 6 weeks: up to 200 bpm
Small dogs, up to 20lb (9.07kg): 70 – 180 bpm
Medium & large dogs: 60 – 140 bpm
Dog Body Temperatures
Your dog’s normal rectal temperature is 101.5 degrees Fahrenheit. Temperatures from 99 to 103 degrees Fahrenheit are usually considered to be within the normal range.

Temperatures below 96 Fahrenheit or above 106 Fahrenheit are considered critical.

Pet owners should see their vet ASAP as these temperature extremes may be life threatening and are emergencies.

 

Dog Oral Mucous Membrane Colors (Gum Color)
Veterinarians use the color of the mucus membranes to get an immediate measure of your pet’s hydration level.

While this is not specifically a scientific measurement of pet health, the color of your dog’s gums can help to identify that a problem exists.

Normally your dog’s gum color should be light pink, which is normal.
Gums pale to white in color indicate a lack of red blood cells referred to as anemia which can lead to shock. Pet owners need to address this with their vet immediately.
A bluish gum color is a sign of smoke inhalation or suffocation. This is an emergency!
Bright cherry red gum color is a sign of carbon monoxide poisoning or heatstroke. Both are emergencies and require veterinary care ASAP!
Liver problems may be revealed by a yellowish tint to the gums which is called jaundice. This requires immediate attention from your vet.
Canine Capillary Refill Time
Capillaries are minute blood vessels that lie near the surface of the skin. They are easiest to observe in your pet’s gums, above the upper teeth.

Dogs

You can judge the condition of your pet’s blood circulation by performing a capillary refill test.
To Perform a Capillary Refill Test on your dog:

1. Lift your pet’s upper lip, then press the flat part of your index finger against the non-pigmented (no color) pink gum tissue

2. Quickly release the pressure and use the second hand of a watch to count the time it takes for the gum color to return to normal in the area.

This is your dog’s capillary refill time.
Canine Capillary Refill Time
If less than 1 second this is an emergency. It may indicate shock or heatstroke.
If 1 – 2 seconds, this is normal.
If 2 – 4 seconds, this is poor and may signal pending dehydration or shock.
If over 4 seconds, this indicates a severe problem such as dehydration and/or shock; this requires a trip to the emergency vet.
Monitoring Your Dogs Breathing
When your dog is at rest, anything other than quiet, effortless breathing may require medical attention and possibly artificial respiration.

Effortless breathing, quiet to soundless is normal.

Increased respiratory rate may indicate initial signs of a breathing problem. Call the vet if this if the breathing rate seems to be getting worse.

Excessive panting or gasping is a critical sign of pending respiratory failure. Dogs usually stand with their elbows pointed outward as they try to get oxygen.

Cats often sit crouched with their head and neck extended. This is an emergency and requires immediate attention from your vet.

Labored, open-mouthed breathing with bluish colored gums usually signals suffocation and pulmonary failure. See your vet ASAP!

Slowed, shallow breathing or no breathing signals unconsciousness and respiratory collapse. This is critical, see your vet immediately and prepare for artificial respiration.

Dogs
Dog Mental Alertness/Responsiveness/ Level of Consciousness
Healthy pets are alert and normally respond to whatever is currently happening in their surroundings.

If there is a problem, the level of your dog’s responsiveness will help you to determine the severity of the condition.

Dogs are normally alert, responsive to their owner as well as to the environment.

For example, if you call your pet for a treat, your dog should respond by coming to you.

Dogs with depressed responses may indicate your dog is sleepy and/or arthritic and reluctant to move.

This is common to many canine illnesses and if this continues for over 24 hours visit your vet.

If your dog is disoriented and/or bumps into objects, stares blindly at the walls, walks in circles, and/or falls over to one side, this is cause for alarm. This may signal a neurologic problem or an inner ear issues causing a loss of balance. See your vet ASAP!

Dogs in a stupor that can only be aroused only by deep pain stimulation, for example by pinching the toe, are not normal. This often indicates a serious neurologic or other internal health disorder which should be addressed with your vet immediately.

Dogs that are comatose, unable to wake up or are having epileptic seizures require immediate attention. This is a true emergency indicating severe neurologic damage or disruption from an injury, a disease, or a toxin. See your vet ASAP!

Holistic Veterinarian Dr. Carol Osborne, DVM

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Health Diplomat, a published author and a practicing, integrative veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio. She welcomes new canine and feline patients.

Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and creates homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats.   – See more at: http://blog.carolonpets.com/#sthash.Nfq5q569.dpuf

The Anti-Aging “A” Natural Pet Supplement List for Your Dog & Cat

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Vitamin A: The water soluble form which is called Vitamin A Palmitate is a vital antioxidant for your pet that enhances immunity, and is essential for your dog and cat to utilize protein in his or her diet.  Beware of supplements containing Retinyl Palmitate.

Retinyl Palmitate is the fat soluble form of Vitamin A. It accumulates in the body and can become toxic because unlike water soluble vitamins it is not eliminated daily in the urine. In addition cats are not able to convert Retinyl Palmitate to the active, usable form of Vitamin A.
Vitamin C: Ascorbic Acid is the form of Vitamin C that acts as an antioxidant. Vitamin C is needed for tissue growth and repair. It also enhances pet immunity and is needed for your pet’s body to utilize Vitamin E.
Vitamin E: Vitamin E is one of the four fat soluble vitamins along with Vitamin A, D, and K. Vitamin E acts as an antioxidant. It also prevents heart disease, promotes wound healing, needed for your dog and cat’s body to utilize Vitamin C.
B-Complex Vitamins: As a group, B vitamins help your dog to maintain healthy nerves, skin and muscle. B-Vitamins are needed to provide energy to the body. Beware of supplements containing Brewer’s Yeast!

Brewer’s Yeast is a leading cause of allergies and itching in dogs and cats and is commonly used to provide low cost, inferior quality B Vitamins.
Coenzyme Q-10: A powerful, antioxidant which is found in the highest quantities in your pet’s heart. CoQ10 is essential for your pet’s immune function and is not only, beneficial for heart function but in Europe is used to treat heart disease.
Alpha Lipoic Acid: This antioxidant is both water and fat soluble and helps your dog to restore energy metabolism.
Selenium: Selenium is an essential mineral that works with Vitamin E to help your pet combat infection, by boosting internal Immunity. Selenium also acts an antioxidant and is beneficial to your pet’s skin and hair coat. Deficiencies of Selenium have been linked to cancer and heart disease.

Zinc: Zinc is an essential mineral pet’s need for protein synthesis. Zinc promotes healthy immune systems; an aid wound healing and is critical for hundreds of biological processes in your dog and cat’s body.
Omega-3 Fatty Acids: Omega-3 fatty Acids are essential components of cell membranes in your pet and are vital to healthy heart and brain function along with maintenance of dog and cat skin and hair coats.
Bioflavonoids: Bioflavonoids enhances the absorption of Vitamin C, have antioxidant effects, promote normal blood circulation and combat allergies for your dog and cat.
Glucosamine and Methyl-Sulfonyl-Methane (MSM): Both of these naturally occurring nutrients promote strong healthy bones, joints and cartilage for your dog and cat.
Digestive Enzymes: Digestive Enzymes are essential to life. There are five essential digestive enzymes pets require: Amylase to digest carbohydrates, protease to digest protein, lipase to digest fat, Cellulase to digest cellulose or plant fiber and lactose to digest lactase which is milk protein. Digestive Enzymes are manufactured in your pet’s pancreas and are vital to digest dietary nutrients for dogs and cats.
Melatonin: Melatonin is a naturally occurring amino acid found in highest concentration in your pet’s brain. Melatonin is the chief nutrient responsible for maintaining the health and wellness of the brain. It also combats Alzheimer’s and senility. In addition, it acts as an immune modulator and an antioxidant, triggering restful sleep for your dog and cat.
Ginseng: Ginseng has been used in Europe for centuries as a natural energizing herbal tonic which also promotes brain health and overall wellness for your dog and cat.
L-Glutamine: This is the primary amino acid needed for your dog and cat to energize the cells of their digestive system so dietary nutrients can be properly absorbed from the intestines and utilized after they have been digested in the stomach.
Colostrum: The first milk your puppy and kitten receive from their mother. Colostrum provides your dog and cat with their initial antibodies to protect him or her against disease and aid in immune system function.
Exercise: 20 minutes twice a day minimum for your dog. Ten minutes of playtime 4 times a day works well for cats.
Balanced, natural diet: Feed your dog and cat at least two meals daily. Fresh organic and natural nutrient sources are best.
Relaxation: Stress and anxiety affect pets and people adversely and elevated the aging hormone called Cortisol. Set aside an hour a day to relax and enjoy your dog and cat. Consider massage, yoga and music.
Positive mental attitude: The mind-body connection is a potent promoter of well-being for you as well as your dog and cat.
Pure water: Fresh, non-chlorinated preferably distilled water is essential for people and best for your dog and cat. Fresh water should be available at all times 24/7.

 

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat, a published author and a practicing, holistic veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients.

Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and makes homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats

Pet Antioxidants: Benefits for Dogs & Cats

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Your pet’s body naturally contains many antioxidants that work together, in a variety of ways to help protect and insure your pet’s health. Vitamins, minerals and certain nutrients are classified as antioxidants. Examples of antioxidants of importance for your pet’s health include: Vitamin A, Vitamin C and Vitamin E, the minerals: Selenium and Zinc, Calcium and Magnesium along with the natural nutrients Alpha Lipoic Acid, Lutein and Coenzyme Q10.

Antioxidants neutralize harmful compounds in pets called free radicals. Pet free radicals are formed each time your dog or cat takes a breath. Exposure to the sun’s ultraviolet rays, environmental toxins, pollution, heavy metals, stress, diet and drugs, including antibiotics, also contribute to their production. Billions of free radicals are formed in your dog’s and cat’s body each day.

Free radicals cause oxidative stress, which damages your pet’s body; in much the same way that oxygen causes iron to rust. Free radicals damage your dogs and cats cells and can also adversely effect vital tissues, organs and even DNA, their genetic material. These harmful changes accumulate and have been proven to decrease the quality and length of pet life.

Pet antioxidant supplements can increase your pets healthy life span and slow the aging process by providing the body with additional defenses against free radicals and decreasing the resultant levels of oxidative damage. Oxidative damage has been associated with many of the leading age related degenerative pet diseases including cancer, heart disease, liver and kidney disorders as well as arthritis and diabetes.

It is noteworthy to mention that phosphorus, iron and copper increase the rate at which dogs and cats age. Research documents the fact that by accelerating the pet aging process in dogs and cats, these elements actually decrease your pets healthy lifespan and reduce the length of their lives as a result. In addition, phosphorus accelerates kidney disease.

Pet vitamin supplements such as PAAWS Pet Vitamins and VitaLife Pet Supplements contain optimal levels of water soluble, natural anti-oxidants that are custom blended and patented specifically for dogs and cats. The PAAWS and VitaLife Advanced AM/PM Health and Wellness Complex are designed and dosed for pets based on their age and body weight.

Clinical Trials results from ongoing the 14 year Clinical Trials Life Time Study show that dogs and cats on Paaws Pet Vitamins are enjoying up to a 30% increase in healthy pet lifespans, which translates into 3-4 extra healthy years pets and their owners can both enjoy together. That’s something to bark about!

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat and a practicing, holistic veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients. Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and makes homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats

Feline Asthma: Does Your Cat Have It?

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It is estimated that over 800,000 domestic cats suffer from feline asthma – is your cat one of these statistics? Feline asthma is a respiratory disorder that can range from mild to severe in the cat population. Could your cat be suffering from symptoms of feline asthma without you recognizing the disorder?

A chronic respiratory disease, the most common symptom of feline asthma is wheezing, or difficulty breathing. Allergies and stress are two potential triggers for wheezing episodes. Pollen, mold, and dust particles are often the most common allergen triggers found outdoors while perfumes, tobacco smoke, and dust from litter boxes and cleaning products contribute from within the home.

Signs and symptoms of feline asthma include:

* Coughing similar to that which typically produces a hair-ball, only no hair-ball is expelled;

* Wheezing;

* Shortness of breath;

* Changes in breathing patterns – breathing may be rapid or slow, but occurs with difficulty;

* Open mouth breathing.

If you believe that your cat may be suffering from feline asthma, seek the advice of your veterinarian. Feline asthma is a disorder which can be treated successfully with many cats living a normal life span; however, one severe asthma attack in your pet can end his life if not treated promptly.

Stay tuned .. tomorrow we will be discussing feline asthma treatments and long-term management of this condition.

Holistic veterinarian and researcher, Dr. Carol Osborne, DVM is available for pet health care consultations and pet health questions.

Call Dr. Carol’s office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for your pet.

What Not to Feed Your Pet

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Because we routinely feed our pets bits and pieces of “human food” as a treat or snack, it is important that pet owners keep in mind a list of foods that are not safe to feed. Home-made pet foods are a wonderful way to ensure your pets dietary needs are adequately met, but be cautious about any home-made pet recipe that includes the following foods.

* Avacados – Although the avacado is a favorite among many diets, pet parents should be cautious not to feed avacado to their dogs. Avacados contain a fungicidal toxin called persin that may be harmful to pets. If your pet has licked clean your guacamole bowl, watch for danger signs such as: diarrhea, vomiting, difficulty breathing, and heart palpitations.

* Fat - Those fatty edges around your steak at the restaurant may seem to be a treat for your pet, but danger lurks in those greasy bits. Pancreatitis, for example, is but one example of gastrointestinal issues that can result from consistently treating your pet to the fatty portions. Symptoms of pancreatitis in pets can include: vomiting, weight loss, diarrhea, abdominal pain, weakness, and dehydration.

* Grapes and/or Raisins - Grapes, especially when frozen, can seem like a fun, tasty treat for your pets on hot summer days. Boxes of raisins are often “stolen” by pets because of the sweet smell that comes from the box! Regardless of how your pet acquires grapes or raisins, pet parents must understand that these tasty snacks can actually cause kidney failure in your pet.

* Macadamia Nuts - It isn’t terribly uncommon to see a pet owner feed their dog a bit or two of a delicious cookie as a treat. When the cookie contains macadamia nuts, however, trouble is often soon to follow. A toxic compound in the macadamia has been shown to lead to gastrointestinal issues for pets within as few as twelve hours.

* Chocolate – Most pet owners are aware that chocolate can be toxic to dogs, yet many will feed a bite or two to their pet thinking, “Oh, a small amount won’t hurt.” The truth of the matter is, a small amount can be dangerous depending on the amount of theobromine contained in the chocolate. Also, never believe that only dark chocolate can hurt your dog — white chocolate should be a considered a no-no when it comes to feeding as well.

* Raw Egg Whites - Unless under the direct advice of your veterinarian, never feed your pet raw egg whites. Salmonella is as grave concern for the pet population as the human population. If you wish to feed your pet eggs, please be certain to use cooked eggs or cook the dish after adding the raw eggs.

* Mushrooms – Mushrooms can cause liver and kidney dysfunction and failure when consumed in large amounts by the pet population.

* Onion and/or Garlic – Though few pets will willingly accept a feeding that contains a large amount of raw onion and/or garlic, many pets will happily feast on a dinnertime feeding that contains these same ingredients cooked. Though a small amount of garlic and onion to add a bit of flavor  is generally considered safe, larger amounts fed over a length of time can be dangerous.

* Dairy Products - Again, small amounts of dairy products are typically safe to feed your pet; however, large quantities over time may be asking for trouble. It’s important that pet owners understand that adult dogs, especially, are more likely to have a lactose intolerance issues. If your pet experiences diarrhea shortly after a feeding that included milk and/or other dairy products, a lactose intolerance issue may be considered.

* Bones - Many dogs enjoy chewing on a tasty bone after the family eats dinner, by choosing to feed your pet a bone, you are placing his or her health at risk. Bones splinter when chewed, and while the dog may swallow these splinters without trouble, issues can arise later as the bone fragments are pushed through the intestinal tract.

* Sugar-free Products/Candy – Many sugarless gums and candies contain xylitol which can be life-threatening to pets.

This list is by no means a comprehensive list of all the foods that can be harmful to your pet. Should you have any question about whether a food is safe to feed  your pet, please seek the advice of your veterinarian BEFORE offering the food to your pet. Remember to supplement your pets’ diet with a natural vitamin and mineral supplement to ensure proper nutrition.

Holistic veterinarian and researcher, Dr. Carol Osborne, DVM is available for pet health care consultations and pet health questions.

Call Dr. Carol’s office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for your pet.

Getting Ready for Easter

Cats, Dogs, General Health, General Health, Pet Holiday Safety Tips No Comments »

Easter is a favorite holiday for kids and adults alike. Family and church gatherings are often filled with delicious foods and candy treats, not to mention Easter egg hunts that are enjoyed by the young and old alike. While many pet owners are cautious regarding celebrations around Christmas, Valentine’s Day, and Independence Day, it seems that Easter foods and decorations are often overlooked in regards to pet health issues. Dr Carol would like to remind you about some Easter safety tips for your pets to ensure everyone enjoys the celebrations!

*  Cats typically tend to “smell the flowers” more then their canine counterparts, and it’s of little surprise that more cats are poisoned as a result of eating house plants and bouquet decorations. Lilies are a favorite around Easter in many homes, but these beautiful blossoms can cause kidney failure in cats.

* Careful with the candles! Decorative and fragrant candles can be beautiful and help to add a pleasing scent to the atmosphere. Parents of small children are often careful to place lit candles out of arm’s reach of a human child, but animal parents are sometimes forgetful that little Fido is as curious as any other youngster! Wagging tails and swiping paws can easily knock over a candle resulting in burns, messes, and worst of all, fires.

* Be especially attentive of pets in or around the kitchen and dining area during preparations and celebrations. Raw yeast dough can be especially dangerous for dogs and owners should remember that even a small amount can be harmful. Dogs also love the chocolates that are often shared at Easter. Chocolate bunnies can be deadly for your pup.

* Don’t share the Easter entree’ bones with your dog. Many pet owners will give their dog the bone from the ham, turkey, or lamb that is often prepared for Easter. Bones can splinter and cause intestinal problems for dogs and should be avoided.

All this week we will be sharing ways that you can enjoy Easter with your pet without compromising safety. Dr Carol will offer a nutritious snack or meal each day this week that you can consider preparing just for your pampered pooch so he or she can still be treated to a “special” meal at Easter.


Holistic veterinarian and pet health researcher,  Dr. Carol Osborne, DVM., is available for pet health questions and pet health consultations for dogs and/ or cats.
Contact Dr. Carol’s veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for your dog and/or cat today.

When Animals Get Car Sick

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It’s not uncommon for an animal to become car sick. Just as humans sometimes suffer from motion sickness, sea sickness, or car sickness, these same afflictions can occur in our pets. When humans become car sick, the advice is typically to take medication, have the sick rider sit in the front seat, and have a cool breeze blowing in the vehicle. But, what do you do when your dog gets car sick?

First, consider how often your dog will be riding in the car. If you only plan to take your pet on very short car trips on few occasions, the easiest solution may be to simply give your pet a ginger snap cookie about thirty minutes before hopping in the car. Ginger is known to settle the stomach and can combat nausea.

If you’ll be traveling longer distances more frequently, you might consider attempting to desensitize your pet to the car. Start by simply strapping your pet into the car for a few moments and sit there. Wait a few moments, unstrap the dog, and get out. Do this a couple of times and then begin to give the dog a treat after he exits the car. Wait a few days. Repeat the process, only this time start the car and let the engine idle for a few moments. Repeat the same steps, giving the dog a treat upon his exit from the car. The next step in the process would be to move the vehicle a short distance, then a bit longer, and even longer the next trip. Eventually, the dog will associate the car ride with a treat and look forward to his trips. At the same time, he will lose his nervousness and may be less likely to get sick.

If you are unable to desensitize your pet to the vehicle, and long road trips are going to be required, talk to your veterinarian about the possibility of prescribing medications. And, always, even on short trips, keep your pets buckled up! Dogs should not be allowed to ride with their heads outside the windows.


Holistic veterinarian and pet health researcher,  Dr. Carol Osborne, DVM., is available for pet health questions and pet health consultations for dogs and/ or cats. Contact Dr. Carol’s veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for your dog and/or cat today.

Anemia in Dogs and Cats

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Like humans, dogs and cats can suffer from anemia, or a deficiency of red blood cells. Red blood cells carry oxygen to the body’s tissue. Anemia in dogs and cats is generally found after a routine blood test by the veterinarian.

Symptoms of Anemia in Dogs and Cats:

Common symptoms of anemia in dogs and cats include lethargy, loss of appetite, and unusual weakness. Gum tissue in the animal’s mouth may appear a lighter pink or even white depending on the severity of anemia. In cases of severe anemia, the dog or cat may experience a rapid pulse and have increased respirations. Some severely anemic pets will collapse with exertion.

What Causes Anemia in Dogs and Cats?

Blood loss is the most common reason for anemia in adult dogs and cats. Traumatic injuries, tumors, or chronic slow bleeding within the gastrointestinal tract can all result in enough blood loss that an animal becomes anemic. Internal and external parasites often cause excessive bleeding for younger pups and kittens.

Red blood cells breaking down at a faster pace than normal can also result in anemia in dogs and cats. The accelerated decomposition of blood cells is known as hemolysis. Infectious diseases, adverse reactions to medications, bites from poisonous snakes, and severe infections are sometimes the culprits of hemolysis. Some animals are born with congenital hemolytic anemia. Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia is a result of the animal’s own antibodies attacking red blood cells.

Treating Anemia in Dogs and Cats

In order to treat anemia in dogs and cats, the reason for the anemia must first be understood. When the cause is determined, your veterinarian can take specific measures to attempt to restore the red blood cell count to a normal level.  Unfortunately, little treatment has been proven effective to treat congenital hemolytic anemia.

Dr Carol’s Recommendation:

We have seen success treating many cases of anemia in both dogs and cats by using simple home-made diets that incorporate semi-cooked organic food sources that are rich in B-vitamins, such as beef or chicken liver and hearts. Natural vitamin-mineral supplements are very helpful to boost red blood cell levels.

Herbs that may be helpful include parsley and kombu. Parsley is high in vitamins A, B, and C. Kombu is known to be rich in various minerals and a broth made from kombu may be a consideration.

A homeopathic anemia treatment is Dong quai, or Angelica sinensis. Dong quai is a traditional Chinese blood-tonic herb. To use Dong quai for anemia in pets, use ¼ tsp per 10-15 pounds of body weight. Divide this into two daily doses.

 

Holistic veterinarian and pet health researcher,  Dr. Carol Osborne, DVM., is available for pet health questions and pet health consultations for dogs and/ or cats. Contact Dr. Carol’s veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for your dog and/or cat today.

 

Why Chocolate is Never a Treat for Your Cat

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Face it, many cats love chocolate. And, because we humans love chocolate too, we have probably contributed to our pets’ taste for this treat. But for cats, this ‘treat’ can be deadly.  

Chocolate can be very dangerous to your cat.

Chocolate toxicity is one of the most common ‘poisonings’ we see in veterinary clinics, especially during the busy holiday season and Valentine’s Day. We know to keep that chocolate box meant especially for guests or that gift box of chocolates from our sweetheart out of Fluffy’s or Fido’s reach. But it is easy to overlook holiday baking with its more deadly chocolate forms – semisweet chocolate chips and baking chocolate.

Some cats tolerate chocolate better than others. Although the toxic dosage varies from animal to animal, everyone agrees that chocolate contains a lethal ingredient, a methylxanthine called theobromine, and that baking chocolate contains 10 times more of this lethal ingredient than milk chocolate.

Theobromine acts on four areas of your cat’s body:

  • It increases the rate and force of contractions of the heart.
  • It acts as a diuretic, causing your pet to lose body fluids.
  • It affects the gastrointestinal system, causing vomiting and diarrhea and it may cause stomach ulcers.
  • It acts on the nervous system, causing convulsions, seizures and sometimes, death.

If you find that your cat has ingested some chocolate, call your veterinarian or emergency clinic immediately. They will probably ask you the size of your cat, the type and quantity of chocolate your cat has eaten, and how long ago it was eaten. Try to have these answers before you call. They then may tell you to make your cat vomit. This will depend on the amount of chocolate ingested and how long ago it was eaten. If your veterinarian or emergency clinic determine that your cat needs to come into the hospital, do not delay. The effects of chocolate toxicity may not be apparent right away, but do not let that lull you into a false sense of security.

Holistic veterinarian and pet health researcher,  Dr. Carol Osborne, DVM., is available for pet health questions and pet health consultations for dogs and/ or cats.

Contact Dr. Carol’s veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for your dog and/or cat today.

 

Pet Vaccines: New Standards for Dogs & Cats

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NEW PRINCIPLES OF PET IMMUNOLOGY

Dr. Carol presents a Web Series on Today’s New Approved Veterinary Vaccination Standards  & Protocols for Dogs & Cats

“Dogs and cats immune systems mature fully at 6 months. If a modified live virus (MLV) vaccine is given after 6 months of age, it produces an immunity which is good for the life of the pet (ie: canine distemper, parvovirus, feline distemper). If another MLV vaccine is given a year later, the antibodies from the first vaccine neutralize the antigens of the second vaccine and there is little or no effect. The titer is not “boosted” nor are more memory cells induced.”

Not only are annual boosters for Parvovirus and distemper unnecessary, they subject the pet to potential risks of allergic reactions and immune-mediated hemolytic anemia. “There is no scientific documentation to back up label claims for annual administration of MLV vaccines.”

Puppies receive antibodies through their mother’s milk. This natural protection can last 8-14 weeks. Puppies & kittens should NOT be vaccinated at LESS than 8 weeks of age. Maternal immunity will neutralize the pet vaccine and little protection (0-38%) will be produced.

Pet Vaccination given at 6 weeks will, however, delay the timing of the first highly effective vaccine. Vaccinations given 2 weeks apart suppress rather than stimulate the immune system. A series of vaccinations is given starting at 8-12 weeks and given 3-4 weeks apart up to 16 weeks of age. Another vaccination given sometime after 6 months of age (usually at 1 year 4 months) will provide most pets with lifetime immunity.

 

Holistic veterinarian and pet health researcher,  Dr. Carol Osborne, DVM., is available for pet health questions and pet health consultations for dogs and/ or cats.

Contact Dr. Carol’s veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for your dog and/or cat today.

 

 

 
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