How to Detect and Manage Cat Lice

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Cats & Lice

Cat Lice are tiny, six-legged parasites that feed on blood and can cause anemia. Weak, run-down kittens are the most susceptible to feline lice.

Tiny white spots, called nits are visible to your eye and are located in your cats fur. These are the cat lice egg casings, visible in the photo below.   Lice egg casings in cat fur

Feline lice spend their entire life on your cat and are not transferable to other pets or people.

They do not infest your home and are a problem primarily in the cooler winter months. Feline lice can cause blood loss which in young kittens can result in anemia.

In the United States, lice on kittens and puppies are rare although head lice on school children are quite common.

SIGNS OF CAT LICE

Itching
White nits in hair
Anemia (pale-whitish gum color in a weak kitten)

Cat Bath helps to remove  Lice

WHAT YOU and YOUR VET CAN DO for CAT LICE

  • Once cat lice have been confirmed, the treatment for feline lice is relatively straightforward and is similar to that for fleas. Most products that kill fleas also kill lice.

Bathe your cat with d-limolene or a pyrethrin-based shampoo. This kills adult lice but not eggs, so repeat the baths weekly until all the eggs are gone. Leave the suds on for 5-10 minutes, then rinse well.

Pyrethrin dips are also effective for lice.

Chrysanthemums contain pyrethrins which are effective for lice and fleas. These are available commercially as dips which are sponged on after bathing and allowed to air dry.

Improve the general health of your kitten. Enhance the diet by adding a natural pet comprehensive vitamin-mineral supplement rich in B-Vitamins which will help to combat anemia by promoting red blood cell production.

Cat Louse Magnified

COMPLEMENTARY CAT LICE THERAPY

Itching from mites and cat lice which are magnified and may be seen in photo on the left can be controlled with

Vitamin C supplementation – 250 milligrams of powder 3 times daily added to meals.

Vitamin E – 400 IU (international units) per week added to meals.

HERBAL CAT FLEA REMEDIES

Citrus fruits like lemons contain d-limolene which act as a repellent for lice and fleas and mites.

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat, a published author and a practicing, holistic veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients.

Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and makes homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats

Pudgy Pets: How to Battle the Bulge this New Year

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Pet owners
wondering how to achieve and/or maintain a healthy body weight for Fido and Fluffy this New Year may want to think twice before reaching for traditional pet treats or snuggling up on the sofa with a pet video.

A new study suggests that both daily exercise and calories consumed are related to body weight.

Altering either, for example increasing exercise by 20 minutes a day or reducing calories by even ten percent, correlates with a reduction in your pet’s body mass index (BMI) and a corresponding increase in the quality of your pet’s health status and future longevity.

Ultimately researchers found that making small changes in your dog or cat’s diet and/or daily exercise may lead to a reduction in the number of pets that suffer with obesity.

Obesity which affects nearly fifty percent of America’s dogs and cats is defined as being 15 percent or more above the ideal weight for that pet’s age and breed.

Being just ten percent overweight reduces your pet’s life span by one-third and predisposes him or her to a variety of disorders ranging from arthritis and diabetes to cancer and heart disease.

Hormones and genetics as well as individual variations in metabolism and appetite are predisposing factors. However, the single most common cause of obesity in pets today is well meaning owners who indulge their pets with oversized portions and excessive treats.

Pet obesity has become a multi-dimensional issue with social and veterinary medical factors but maintaining a healthy pet body weight is essentially the difference between energy consumed and energy expended.

This study focused on both factors together as they relate to pet health and longevity.

Results indicated that increasing exercise by one hour ads up to four extra days to your pet’s lifespan.

Reducing your pet’s body weight by just ten percent increases his or her potential healthy lifespan by up to thirty three percent.

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat, a published author and a practicing, holistic veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients.

Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and makes homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats

How to Detect Pet Cancer

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According to Veterinary Pet Insurance Company over 48,000 claims were received last year, making pet cancer related claims the fourth most common pet medical claim for 2011.

VPI in partnership with the Animal Cancer Foundation (ACF) recognize November as National Pet Cancer Awareness month. In addition they are hosting the sixth annual Pet Cancer Awareness Walk in Long Beach California on November 11, 2012 to raise funds for pet cancer research.

For pet owners interested in helping, VPI will match Facebook Likes by donating one dollar for each new Facebook “Like” up to ten thousand dollars. So far VPI has raised over 100 thousand dollars to help support pet cancer research.

Today, pet cancer is the leading cause of death in dogs and cats, with Lymphosarcoma which is also referred to as Lymphoma leading the way. The remaining types of pet cancer most prevalent in dogs and cats are listed below in order of prevalence.

  1. Lymphosarcoma or Lymphoma
  2. Skin Cancer
  3. Spleen Cancer
  4. Bone and Joint Cancer
  5. Liver Cancer
  6. Chest Cancer
  7. Urinary Bladder Cancer
  8. Brain and Spinal Cord Cancer
  9. Mouth Cancer
  10. Abdominal Cavity) Cancer

With respect to Lymphoma cancer, it ranks first in prevalence and cost. The average financial burden paid by pet owners to treat Lymphosarcoma averaged just under $2500.00 per pet. Policy owners shelled out over 17 million dollars to treat the top 10 types of pet cancer.

Recognizing signs of pet cancer can be very helpful for pet owners as the sooner cancer is detected, the quicker a treatment protocol can be initiated which increases the odds for a successful outcome.

What are signs of Pet Cancer?

1. Any lump that increases in size, ulcerates and /or bleeds

2. Open sores that do not heal normally

3. Severe and abrupt appetite changes

4. Dramatic weight loss in a short time span

5. Bleeding and/or discharges from any bodily orifice

6. Trouble eating and/or swallowing

7. Extreme lethargy with sudden exercise intolerance

Always check with your veterinarian any time your pet isn’t doing well.

Remember an ounce of prevention is worth far more than a pound of cure, especially when your pet’s health is at risk!

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat, a published author and a practicing, holistic veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients. Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and makes homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats

 

Doping Dogs is No Laughing Matter

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Most of us are familiar with marijuana, and its medicinal properties. Benefits touted include helping cancer patients cope with daily life, appetite enhancement and pain relief. The number of states in which marijuana may be legally obtained is increasing and legislation is pending to legalize this plant in many more states across the country.

In states like Colorado, where the weed has been legal for over 12 years, a new study found that one unintended side effect of legalized pot is the number of pets getting sick from accidental ingestion. According to one Colorado veterinarian, the number of cases of marijuana poisoning in animals has quadrupled over the last five years and vets treating these doped dogs is becoming quite common as a result.

 

Unfortunately, ingesting this plant can cause pets to become quite sick. Many dogs become lethargic, lose their balance and wobble on all four legs. In severe cases after eating the weed, dogs may begin to stagger and vomit, go into a coma and some occasionally die.

How are dogs getting ahold of the plant?

Primarily through pet owner negligence. Dogs tend to eat their owners baked goods which are made with medical grade marijuana butter and sold at licensed dispensaries.
Although pets could become sickened by smoke inhalation, the primary problem is ingesting the butter as its content of THC is condensed; consequently it’s higher and potentially more toxic.

So, What’s the Solution?

Use common sense and treat your pot like any other drug. With respect to pets, keep your marijuana in a safe, secure location far away from your pet’s paws.

If you suspect your pet may have become sickened by the plant remember honesty is always the best policy, especially when your pet’s health is at risk.

Come clean with the veterinarian. Tell the truth so your dog can receive proper treatment.

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat, a published author and a practicing, holistic veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients. Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and makes homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats

 

Good Dietary Fats Slow Pet Aging Process

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We have all heard about the benefits of essential omega-3 fatty acids and recent research now indicates that adding good fats to your pet’s diet may slow the aging process and extend your pet’s healthy years. Supplementing your pet’s diet with omega-3 fatty acids alters the ratio or balance between omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids favorably, which slows a key biologic process associated with aging in dogs.

After 4 months of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation, the study found that small segments of genetic material called DNA were actually preserved. Specifically, caps on the end of chromosomes called Telomeres which normally shorten with aging, lengthened.

In addition, dietary omega-3 supplementation reduced free radical damage and consequently lowered oxidative stress by approximately 15% over the group of dogs that did not receive the omega-3 supplements. The same group of dogs was also found to have lowered levels of generalized inflammation which was detected by measuring an inflammatory protein found in blood called Interleukin-6.  A reduction of inflammation within your pet’s body is always beneficial.

The fact that the telomeres actually increased in length suggests that nutritional supplementation might make a substantial difference in the pet aging process.

Another factor scientists studied was the ratio or balance of omega-3 to omega-6 fatty acids.

In general, most commercial canine diets are high in omega-6 fatty acids and much lower in omega-3 fatty acids. The problem is that omega-6 fatty acids induce inflammation while omega-3 fatty acids relieve and reverse inflammation and its associated pain.

Because commercial diets are naturally high in omega-6 fatty acids, the study revealed that supplementing pets with omega-3’s, alters the fatty acid ratio favorably reducing it from 15:1 down to about 3:1.

Scientists found that the combination of benefits achieved, suggests that this type of nutritional intervention has the potential not only to lengthen the healthy pet lifespan but also to lower the risk of developing an array of chronic diseases associated with pet aging. This array includes disorders ranging from arthritis and diabetes to heart disease and even neuro-degenerative disorders such as dementia often referred to as Alzheimer’s disease in dogs.

This study which was partially funded by grants from the National Institute of Health, suggests that inflammation is the ultimate driving force behind shortening telomeres. One can think of a telomere or the short fragment of DNA as a protective cap at the end of each chromosome. This is similar in theory to how the plastic coating protects the end of a shoe lace. When the plastic comes off, the shoelace unravels and no longer works. When the telomere shortens enough, the cell in question becomes diseased and dies.

Telomeres are currently a very hot topic in the study of aging and much more research is being conducted. For now, initial results show that omega-3’s offer many potential benefits when it comes to your pets aging process. Consider supplementing your pet’s diet with Omega-3 Fatty Acids and decide for yourself.

About Dr. Carol

Dr. Carol is a pet health researcher, a Board Certified Anti-Aging Pet Health Diplomat, a published author and a practicing, holistic veterinarian in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.

She welcomes new canine and feline patients. Dr. Carol also offers pet health consultations and answers pet health questions and makes homemade pet diets by phone and e-mail for her online pet loving community.

Pet owners may contact Dr. Carol directly at her veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for their dog(s) and/or cat(s) today.

Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest pet health news, anti-aging tips and updates for your dogs and cats

 

 

Dog and Cat Food Recall Expands Further

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Should we really be surprised that the pet food recall continues to expand? At least two more individuals have been reportedly sickened due to contact with pet food that was contaminated with a strain of salmonella. The pet food recall currently affects 21 states, Puerto Rico, and Canada; however, because some of the food may have been sold online to additional vendors, those in other states should be mindful of the recall and check food packages to ensure the safety of both humans and pets.

To determine if your pet’s food is included in this recall, check by brand. Information below is taken directly from the Diamond Pet Food’s Recall website.

Chicken Soup for the Pet Lover’s Soul: Check the production code on the product bag. Look for a “2” or “3” in the 9th position AND an “x” in the 10th or 11th position and a best-before date between December 9, 2012 and April 7, 2013.

Country Value: Check the production code on the product bag. Look for a “2” or “3” in the 9th position AND an “x” in the 10th or 11th position and a best-before date between December 9, 2012 and April 7, 2013.

Diamond: Check the production code on the product bag. Look for a “2” or “3” in the 9th position AND an “x” in the 10th or 11th position and a best-before date between December 9, 2012 and April 7, 2013.

Diamond Naturals: Check the production code on the product bag. Look for a “2” or “3” in the 9th position AND an “x” in the 10th or 11th position and a best-before date between December 9, 2012 and April 7, 2013.

Premium Edge: Check the production code on the product bag. Look for a “2” or “3” in the 9th position AND an “x” in the 10th or 11th position and a best-before date between December 9, 2012 and April 7, 2013.

Professional: Check the production code on the product bag. Look for a “2” or “3” in the 9th position AND an “x” in the 10th or 11th position and a best-before date between December 9, 2012 and April 7, 2013.

4Health: Check the production code on the product bag. Look for a “2” or “3” in the 9th position AND an “x” in the 10th or 11th position and a best-before date between December 9, 2012 and April 7, 2013.

Taste of the Wild: Check the production code on the product bag. Look for a “2” or “3” in the 9th position AND an “x” in the 10th or 11th position and a best-before date between December 9, 2012 and April 7, 2013.

Apex: Twenty (20) and forty (40) pound bags of Apex Chicken and Rice Dog Food with a production code of ACD0101B32 and a best-by date of January 24, 2013.

Kirkland: Kirkland brands affected include: Kirkland Signature Super Premium Adult Lamb, Rice & Vegetable Formula; Kirkland Super Premium Adult Dog Chicken, Rice & Vegetable Formula; Kirkland Signature Super Premium Mature Dog Chicken, Rice & Egg Formula; Kirkland Super Premium Healthy Weight Dog Formulated with Chicken & Vegetables; Kirkland Signature Super Premium Maintenance Cat Chicken & Rice Formula; Kirkland Signature Super Premium Healthy Weight Cat Formula; and Kirkland Signature Nature’s Domain Salmon Meal & Sweet Potato Formula for Dogs.
All Kirkland brands affected by the recall will have a best-before date range of December 9, 2012 – January 31, 2013 AND have BOTH a “3” in the 9th position and an “X” in the 11th position of the product code.  For Kirkland Signature brand products sold in Taiwan, the best-before date range is June 9, 2012 – July 31, 2012 and the product code is the same as above.

Canidae: Affected Canidae brands include: Canidae Dog (All Life Stages); Canidae Dog Chicken Meal & Rice; Canidae Dog, Lamb Meal & Rice; and Canidae Dog Platinum. Check the production code on the bag of dog food and look for a “3” in the 9th position AND an “x” in the 10th or 11th position. Best-before dates on the recalled Canidae pet foods are December 9, 2012 – January 31, 2012.

Several brands are being recalled as a precaution only at this time; however this should not give pet owners a false sense of security that the food within the package is safe. If you believe you have purchased one of the potentially tainted packages of pet food that is being recalled the manufacturer recommends that you carefully dispose of the product in a secured plastic bag. Consumers can request a refund or coupon for a replacement bag of pet food can visit the Refund Protocol page at Diamond Pet Recall.

Solid Gold: Affected brands include one batch of WolfCub Large Breed Puppy Food and one batch of WolfKing Large Breed Adult Dog Food. Both brands have a best-before date of December 30, 2012 and an “X” in the 11th digit of the product code. Bag sizes include 4lb, 15lb, and 33lb bags.

Pet owners concerned about their Solid Gold products can call 1-800-364-4863, Monday – Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Pacific time.

Holistic veterinarian and researcher, Dr. Carol Osborne, DVM is available for pet health care consultations and pet health questions. Call Dr. Carol’s office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for your pet. Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest news, tips and pet anti-aging longevity updates for your dogs and cats.

Could A Coffee Enema Save Your Dog’s Life?

Avoiding Disease, Dogs 2 Comments »

Dr. Carol Osborne has seen first-hand the effects a coffee enema can have a dog – and in one particular case, the effect was nothing short of miraculous. When a friend and clients dog suffered acute liver failure, other veterinarians recommended euthanasia. Unable to part with her pet without at least a second opinion, the pet’s owner contacted Dr. Carol as her last resort. In addition to the administration of intravenous fluids, Dr. Carol gave the small dog a coffee enema. Not only did the dog improve, he began to thrive. Could a coffee enema save your dog’s life?

Coffee, when administered via enema, stimulates the production of glutathione by the liver. Glutathione is required by the liver to function properly. When the liver fails, glutathione production ceases. By stimulating production of this vital nutrient, the coffee enema helps the liver to once again perform.

Coffee enemas also work as a detox.

Think of your dog’s intestines (and yours, for that matter) as a long hose that is several feet long. As years go by, the inside of the hose gets caked with all sorts of residue and debris from material passing through the intestines over time. The walls of the intestines, once thin and clean, will become thicker over time with the debris that sticks to the walls preventing the body from digesting and absorbing vital nutrients.

If something is not done to counteract the thickening of the intestinal walls due to residue and debris the pet or person will gradually begin to lose their energy and the ability to function normally. And we all age – pets and people. And we become afflicted with many of the diseases and degenerative disorders that occur with advancing age. Reducing the build-up of debris within the intestines can help to slow-down the natural aging, and detoxification with a coffee enema may be just what is needed.

Holistic veterinarian and researcher, Dr. Carol Osborne, DVM is available for pet health care consultations and pet health questions. Call Dr. Carol’s office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for your pet. Bookmark www.carolonpets.com for the latest news, tips and pet anti-aging longevity updates for your dogs and cats.

Does My Young Dog Really Need a Supplement?

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Many pet owners often overlook, or underestimate, the need for quality supplementation in young dogs. Just as you would want to ensure that your child has proper nutrition to grow strong and reach his or her full physical and mental potential, the same holds true for your pets. After all, you wouldn’t think that proper nutrition is important only when your child is sick, right?

Most puppies tend to reach maturity between the ages of one and two years. While large and giant breed dogs mature more quickly, age seven is generally accepted as the age at which dogs become “seniors”. Signs of dog aging can be difficult to spot, as they tend to occur slowly, but the aging process begins once a dog hits maturity. Even though an older dog may appear to be in peak health, their internal clock, like ours, continues to tick away, taking its toll on your pets’ health before you know what’s going on.

Longevity research shows that organic diets and proper nutritional supplementation can slow the aging process and significantly extend your dog’s healthy years. Longevity is attributed to 70% lifestyle and 30% genetics. The overwhelming majority (90%) of diseases in dogs can be associated with the degenerative process that occurs as your dog ages. By starting your pup or young dog on proper anti-aging supplementation early, you can help him delay the aging process that we must all go through eventually.

Preliminary results of an 11-year lifetime study of PAAWS vitamin product shows an increase in life expectancy by up to 30% – that correlates to three to four additional healthy years for your dog. Small dogs (those less than 35 pounds at maturity) were still shown to be thriving at age 24, and large dogs (those over 80 pounds at maturity) were still going strong at 18 years of age.

Supplementing your pet’s healthy diet with critical nutrients on a daily basis is the first step in a successful longevity program. When choosing a longevity supplement for your dog, be sure the product is specifically formulated for dogs based on breed size, made in the United States, backed by clinical trials, and the company producing the supplement should have a qualified veterinarian on staff to answer questions. Be sure the product lists each ingredient, the amount of each nutrient, and most importantly, the source from which each nutrient was derived.

Talk to your veterinarian about the benefits of a pro-active versus a reactive care plan for your pet. Pro-active plans are geared to optimize health by preventing, retarding, and/or reversing unwanted aging changes. By helping your pet avoid aging for an extended time, he will be around for many more years to thank you.

Dr Carol examines LassieHolistic veterinarian and pet health researcher,  Dr. Carol Osborne, DVM., is available for pet health questions and pet health consultations for dogs and/ or cats.
Contact Dr. Carol’s veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for your dog and/or cat today.

Diamond Recalls More Dry Dog Food

Avoiding Disease, Dogs, Pet News, Pet Nutrition, Pet-Health-Resources 1 Comment »

Missouri based Diamond Pet Foods has issued a voluntary recall of one run of Chicken Soup for the Pet Lover’s Soul Adult Light Formula dry dog food. After one bag of the dog food tested positive for salmonella, the company announced a recall of four production codes as a preventative measure. A health alert was issued, but at this time there are no reports of sickness in dogs.

Diamond Pet Foods is no stranger to recalls, as this is the second dog food recall within a month. Earlier this month the company announced a recall of certain batches of their Diamond Naturals Lamb Meal & Rice product, also due to salmonella contamination. Production at the processing plant in Gaston, South Carolina was suspended two days after the first recall – the same processing plant where mold contamination in dog food was responsible for the deaths of many dogs nationwide in 2005.

A company official reports that the current dog food being recalled was shipped to ten states: Virginia, Kentucky, Florida, South Carolina, Ohio, Massachusetts, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and Michigan. Pets in other states may also be affected, as it is believed that the dog food may have been distributed after shipping by the company.

Recalled production codes:

Chicken Soup for the Pet Lover’s Soul Adult Light Formula – 35 lb bag:
CLF0102B31XCW –  Best By Date: Jan 27, 2013
CLF0102B31XCW –  Best By Date: Jan 28, 2013
CLF0102B32XWR  - Best By Date: Jan 28, 2013

Chicken Soup for the Pet Lover’s Soul Adult Light Formula – 6 lb bag:
CLF0102B3XALW –  Best By Date: Jan 28, 2013

Diamond Pet Foods recommends that if you have this product in your home, you should discard it immediately. You can contact their offices with any questions at 800-442-0402.

Salmonella is a zoonotic illness, meaning that it can be spread between animals and humans. Pet owners are advised to avoid touching the possibly contaminated food or any food containers that could be contaminated, and hands should be washed thoroughly after properly disposing of any of the recalled dog food.

Dr Carol examines LassieHolistic veterinarian and pet health researcher,  Dr. Carol Osborne, DVM., is available for pet health questions and pet health consultations for dogs and/ or cats.
Contact Dr. Carol’s veterinary office toll free at 1-866-372-2765 to make an appointment for your dog and/or cat today.

Increased Life Through Play for Pets

AllPawsPetTalk, Avoiding Disease, Cats, Dogs 1 Comment »

While all work and no play can make Jack a dull boy, the results can be even worse for Jack’s pet friends.  A sedentary lifestyle has been shown to increase the likelihood of a host of medical issues in humans, and the same holds true for our pets. But, did you know you can actually increase your pets lifespan through simple play?

Pets who are inactive often suffer from health complications such as diabetes and obesity. When your pet feels bad, it’s hard to engage him or her in any playful activity but allowing the pet to remain inactive often only exacerbates the problem at hand. Obese and overweight animals are often prescribed not only a change in diet but increased exercise to help rid them of the excess weight. Excessive weight can cause arthritis, difficulty breathing and other problems in pets that may not be life threatening. Removing the extra weight can decrease the amount of energy needed for their bodies to perform basic functions and allow their heart and lungs to work more efficiently which can add additional life.

But, Dr Carol says the benefit of play and regular exercise can increase the lifespan of even healthy dogs. According to Dr Carol, one hour of play can add two additional days of life to your pet! We all want to help our pets live happy, healthy lives and how much more fun can it get than to be able to do so simply by playing fetch?

So, the next time your pet approaches you with a ball or shows an interest in playing, take a few moments to engage with him. After all, exercise is as good for the human body as it is for your pet. Get outside and play with your pets to increase the quality and quantity of life for both of you!

Dr Carol Osborne is the world’s only veterinarian who is certified in anti-aging medicine. She is uniquely qualified to answer any questions you may have on pet longevity as well as overall pet health. Dr Carol is available for consultations and offers a wide variety of pet health products, including her patented PAAWS vitamin supplements and other pet health items at DrCarol.com.

 
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